Speed Reads

Breonna Taylor

Louisville under state of emergency, closes streets in anticipation of Breonna Taylor decision

The city of Louisville, Kentucky, is seemingly preparing for uproar after an update in Breonna Taylor's case.

Police shot and killed Taylor in March while serving a no-knock warrant related to her ex-boyfriend, later sparking protests in Louisville and around the country. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is expected to deliver an update on the case soon, prompting Louisville's mayor and police department to seemingly prepare for more protests this week, the Louisville Courier Journal reports.

Police first started blocking access to downtown Louisville and setting up no-parking zones on Monday, prompting downtown businesses to start boarding their windows. The Louisville Metro Police Department also canceled vacation and time off requests for officers for the indefinite future. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer bolstered those moves on Tuesday, using an executive order to block on-street parking downtown and shut down five parking garages. A second executive order implemented a state of emergency in the city.

Fischer and the LMPD's interim chief insisted Tuesday they don't know when the results of the state's investigation into Taylor's killing will come out. Cameron denied a report earlier that month that he was ready to present his findings to a grand jury.

The city of Louisville announced a $12 million wrongful death settlement with Taylor's family last week. Taylor's mother Tamika Palmer renewed calls for the arrest of the officers involved in Taylor's death in a press conference after the settlement. Kathryn Krawczyk

Update: This story has been updated to more accurately describe the nature of the no-knock warrant.