Crime and punishment
March 18, 2014

Years of peddling the secrets to instant weight loss and finding free money have caught up to Kevin Trudeau. The well-known late-night television pitchman will have to sell his schlock in a federal prison for the next 10 years, as he was found yesterday in criminal contempt for violating a 2004 court order that barred him from making false infomercials.

"Since the age of 25, (Trudeau) has attempted to cheat others for his own personal gain," U.S. District Judge Ronald Guzman said yesterday, adding that Trudeau is an "unrepentant, untiring, and uncontrollable huckster who has defrauded the unsuspecting for 30 years." Since the 2004 court order, Trudeau's ads aired more than 32,000 times and garnered him more than $40 million in revenue.

Trudeau, who has been in custody since his federal conviction last November, is planning to appeal the ruling. Jordan Valinsky

they believe the children are our future
4:43 p.m. ET
David Ramos/Getty Images

Most parents dream of a better world for their children. Unfortunately, most parents are not Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, who just announced the birth of their first child — a baby girl named Max.

Fortunately, Zuckerburg and Chan do have the resources to do their part to ensure that Max will grow up in a better world — and the rest of us will also get to reap the benefits! In an extended letter addressed to Max (and posted on Facebook), Zuckerberg and Chan have announced that over the course of their lifetimes, they will give away 99 percent of their Facebook shares — currently valued at $45 billion — in an effort to "advance human potential and promote equality."

"Max, we love you and feel a great responsibility to leave the world a better place for you and all children," the letter concludes. "We wish you a life filled with the same love, hope, and joy you give us. We can't wait to see what you bring to this world."

You can read the full letter here. Scott Meslow

Best of
4:00 p.m. ET
Mad Max/Facebook

The National Board of Review (NBR) named Mad Max: Fury Road the best film of 2015 Tuesday, surprising many who thought the group of 120 New York film fans from would pick a "less action-oriented film," The Wrap reports. The film, directed and produced by George Miller, stars Charlize Theron and Tom Hardy in the Mad Max series' fourth installment depicting a rebellion against a tyrannical ruler in post-apocalyptic Australia.

While the win is certainly a victory for Mad Max, "don't take this as a sign that Mad Max is all of a sudden guaranteed to be a gate-crasher at the Oscars," writes Kevin Lincoln at Vulture:

Last year the NBR made the genuinely idiosyncratic decision to recognize A Most Violent Year as the best film of 2014, a decision that didn't quite set the dominos falling for J.C. Chandor's mostly under-the-radar '80s crime epic. The year prior they went with Her, which at least snagged an Academy nomination. [Vulture]

This year, NBR selected Ridley Scott as Best Director and Matt Damon as Best Actor for The Martian. Best Actress went to Brie Larson for Room. See the full list of winners at Variety. Becca Stanek

2:59 p.m. ET

Has Jeb Bush already got a certain someone in mind for a running mate? Answering an audience question about vice presidents at a town hall meeting in Waterloo, Iowa, Bush let it slip that, "Should I be elected president, I would have my vice president — I think she will be a great partner."

It appeared to be almost an intentional "mistake" as he immediately joked, "I mean, did I say that out loud?" The audience laughed, and Bush went on: "We always talk about this with one gender in mind. I think we've reached the point I think in our country where maybe we should be a little less gender specific about this."

But as to who exactly he might be considering, Bush remained tight-lipped. Watch below. Jeva Lange

study says
1:13 p.m. ET
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The U.S. saw its highest level of terrorism-related arrests since September 2001 this year, a study released Tuesday reveals. Through a review of social media accounts and legal documents, researchers at George Washington University found that 56 individuals were arrested in 2015 for either supporting ISIS or plotting to assist the extremist group. "The individuals range from hardened militants to teenage girls, petty criminals, and college students," GWU's director of the program on extremism Lorenzo Vidino told The New York Times. "The diversity is staggering."

That diversity, Vidino suggests, is exactly why identifying and monitoring potential terrorist threats can be such a challenge for law enforcement agencies. "For law enforcement, it's extremely difficult to determine who makes a big leap from keyboard jihadist to doing something," Vidino said.

The average age of the Americans arrested was 26, though individuals ranged from a 15-year-old boy to a 47-year-old former Air Force officer. The overwhelming majority of arrests made were American citizens or permanent residents. An estimated 40 percent of those arrested were converts to Islam and over half of those arrested had attempted to travel abroad.

The FBI has about 900 open inquiries into activity related to ISIS. Becca Stanek

This just in
12:57 p.m. ET
David Cannon/Getty Images

An explosion near a major subway station in Istanbul, Turkey injured at least five people, with some reports suggesting that the blast resulted from a handmade bomb. "The cause of the explosion is not known. We are assessing every possibility," Istanbul Gov. Vasip Sahin said.

Hurriyet newspaper and the Dogan news agency reported that the blast was the result of a bomb; the local mayor of the Bayrampaşa district, where the blast took place, also called the explosion the result of a bomb. An earlier report from Reuters suggested the explosion was caused by a power transformer.

Kurdish rebels have been responsible for several bombings in Istanbul in the past year. The Islamic State has also carried out attacks near the Syrian border as well as in the capital, Ankara. Jeva Lange

This just in
12:42 p.m. ET
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel fired Chicago Police Superintendent Garry McCarthy Tuesday, less than a week after officials released dashcam video footage showing white police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting black teenager Laquan McDonald 16 times. The department had refused for over a year to release the video, which has since led to Van Dyke being charged with murder and sparked protests and demands for reform.

Emanuel hired McCarthy in 2011 to take over the city's law enforcement. The mayor has also requested a "top to bottom" review of the city's police department. Becca Stanek

fowl language
10:56 a.m. ET

You might want to skip getting your true love a partridge or a pair of turtle doves this season if you don't want to break the bank: This year's "12 Days of Christmas" price index, which totals the cost of all the items named in the song, is the most expensive yet. Oddly, the birds are to blame for the .6 percent price increase from 2014, while items like gold rings didn't change in cost (a surprise to economists, who saw the value of gold dip this year).

The cost of partridges rose an entire 25 percent over 2014 due to the bird's "growing popularity as a gourmet food and in backyard farming," according to PNC Wealth Management, who produces the list. A partridge, then, will run you about $25 — the pear tree you stick it in costs $189.99, only a 1.2 percent increase over last year by comparison. The price of turtle doves was additionally up 11.5 percent due to increased grain prices, costing $290 for the pair.

This year, the cost of all the items named in the "12 Days of Christmas" would total $34,130.99, up from $33,933.22 in 2014. Online purchases of the items in 2015 would be higher, at $43,626.73 once it's all said and done. Jeva Lange

See More Speed Reads