Stats of our lives
October 25, 2012

$42,918
Average salary for men one year after graduating from college in 2009

$35,296
Average salary for women one year after graduating

$26,600 
Average student loan debt for 2011 graduates

SourcesAssociated PressThe Consumerist The Week Staff

2016 Watch
9:05 a.m. ET
Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton has no credible challenger for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, and a majority of Democrats are perfectly content with that. Fifty-six percent of registered Democratic voters say they don't care if Clinton faces a serious challenger next year, while only 43 percent say a Clinton cakewalk concerns them, according to a Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll released Tuesday.

The majority will likely get their wish. Clinton typically leads her closest potential rivals by around 50 percentage points in early election polls.

In addition to Clinton, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) is the only major candidate to have formally entered the race on the Democratic side. Jon Terbush

whoops
8:16 a.m. ET
Michael Appleton/Pool/Getty Images

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio meant to email the head of his security detail about his subway commute, but he accidentally sent a copy to The New York Times, too.

The now-public email, addressed to Deputy Inspector Howard Redmond, shows that even the mayor isn't immune to subway delays and commuter frustration. The email's subject line was "2 problems today," and in the email, de Blasio says candidly, "We need a better system."

De Blasio apparently tried to join the average New Yorkers by riding the subway to a Manhattan event on Monday. But when no trains came, de Blasio left the subway, only to find his security vehicles were gone. The email scolds the security detail for not "waiting to confirm" de Blasio made it onto a train.

But aside from reprimanding his staff, de Blasio also voices some common New Yorkers' complaints. "We waited 20 mins for an express only to hear there were major delays," de Blasio wrote in the email. "This was knowable info. Had we had it, we would have avoided a lot of hassles." On the positive side, New Yorkers can hope the mayor's personal struggles with public transit will inspire him to help improve the system. Meghan DeMaria

The rich
7:42 a.m. ET
Larry Busacca/Getty Images/New York Times

Last year wasn't great for investors in hedge funds: On average, hedge funds returned a paltry 3 percent, versus a gain of 13.68 percent on the S&P 500 (with reinvented dividends included), The New York Times reports. Only five of the top 10 hedge fund managers, as ranked by Institutional Investor's Alpha, performed better than the S&P 500. But even though the well-heeled and institutional investors in hedge funds got hosed, The Times notes, "for those who managed their money, the pay was spectacular": $11.62 billion for the top 25 managers.

Or as Alpha puts it, they made "a paltry $11.62 billion combined, barely half of the $21.15 billion the top 25 gained the previous year and roughly equal to what they took home during nightmarish 2008." Citadel's Kenneth Griffin (pictured) was the top earner, at $1.3 billion last year, but the average earning was "just $476 million," not the $846 billion in 2013, Alpha added. And you may not take out your tiny violins. Peter Weber

campaign 2016
6:52 a.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

In what's being billed as "the worst kept secret" in Arkansas, former Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) is officially joining the 2016 presidential race on Tuesday, becoming the sixth Republican in an increasingly crowded field. Huckabee will make his announcement at 11 a.m. (EDT) in Hope, Arkansas, the hometown he famously shares with former President Bill Clinton.

Huckabee is expected to gear his second presidential campaign toward working class social conservatives and claim that he is best positioned to fight the "Clinton Machine," having apparently faced it before when he was governor after Bill Clinton. Republicans are expecting to face Hillary Rodham Clinton as their Democratic opponent in the general election. Peter Weber

ISIS?
6:11 a.m. ET
Ben Torres/Getty Images

On Tuesday, Islamic State's official al-Bayan Radio said that two of its "soldiers of the caliphate" carried out the attack on a cartoon competition in Garland, a suburb of Dallas, because the "exhibit was portraying negative pictures of the Prophet Muhammad." The audio message vowed "even bigger and more bitter" attacks in the future. If authentic (and true), this is the first attack ISIS has claimed credit for inside the U.S.

In the attack, Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi — roommates at an apartment in Arizona — allegedly opened fire at an unarmed guard at Garland's Curtis Culwell Center, and both were quickly shot dead by police. The people inside the exhibit were unaware of the attack until police told them. The FBI had been investigating Simpson since 2006, and accused him of trying to fly to Somalia to wage jihad in 2009; he was given three years of probation. Peter Weber

The Daily Showdown
5:38 a.m. ET

Jessica Williams' report from Washington on Monday's Daily Show is premised on two questionable assumptions: That the Supreme Court will make same-sex marriage a nationwide right, and that this ruling will quiet opponents of gay marriage. Since the writers at The Daily Show have presumably heard of Roe v. Wade, and how much that ended anti-abortion protests, the interviews come across as stylized, participatory gloating. The model is high school graduation.

"With the Supreme Court likely ruling in favor of gay marriage, chances are this would be the last hurrah for the hate class of 2015," Williams said. "Before they moved on to the real world, I wanted to commemorate them." Most of the protesters are pretty gracious, funny even, and then there's Brother Ruben Israel, voted most charismatic. It wouldn't work without Ruben Israel. Watch below. —Peter Weber

Watch this
4:41 a.m. ET

For their rendition of the Carter Family classic "Keep On the Sunny Side," on Monday's Late Show, singer/songwriter Brandi Carlile put on a hat and bolo tie and Scott Avett traded his banjo for an autoharp. The harmonies are as tight as you'd expect, and the lyrics make for pretty good retirement advice (as well as general life counsel). "That was lovely, just lovely," says David Letterman after the performance. And he's not wrong. Watch below. —Peter Weber

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