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November 26, 2015

Ah, Thanksgiving, a day for packing in as much poultry and pigskin as possible. And given the holiday's proclivity for football, NFL teams have a natural incentive to spread the good cheer on turkey day.

If you're the Washington Redskins though, you might want to stay mum on a holiday that traces its roots back to America's takeover of Native American land. The D.C. football team has been embroiled in controversy over its team name — an offensive word for Native Americans — for years. (If you're unclear as to why the name is offensive, this Daily Show segment can get you up to speed.) But rather than miss out on the holiday fun, the team's official Twitter account posted this glaringly oblivious graphic:

At least you can be thankful the Redskins aren't playing today, so their controversial brand won't add to your surely contentious Thanksgiving discussions. Kimberly Alters

10:18 p.m. ET

During a section of the presidential debate devoted to the topic of race, moderator Lester Holt accused Donald Trump of continually perpetuating the falsehood that President Barack Obama wasn't born in the United States — a theory that Hillary Clinton called "a racist lie."

But Trump repeatedly deflected Holt's question, turning the moment around to tout that he was able to get Obama's birth certificate released. Yet as Holt pointed out, Obama's birth certificate was actually released back in 2011, and Trump continued to insinuate Obama was born abroad as recently as January of this year.

Trump again sidestepped the accusations, to which Holt tried one last time to get an answer. "We're talking about racially healing in this segment," Holt said. "What do you say to Americans of color —"

"I say nothing, because I was able to get [Obama] to produce it, he should have produced it a long time before," Trump interrupted. "I say nothing."

When Clinton was given a chance to respond, she said simply, "Just listen to what you heard." Watch Trump deliver his answer, below. Jeva Lange

10:16 p.m. ET

Donald Trump's solution for improving race relations between black communities and police was summed up with three words: "law and order." He again suggested at Monday's Hofstra University debate that police reinstate "stop and frisk." "Stop and frisk was ruled unconstitutional in New York, largely because it largely singled out black and Hispanic young men," Lester Holt said. "No, you're wrong," Donald Trump responded. "It went before a judge, who was a very against-police judge," he argued, and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio declined to appeal.

Stop and frisk was ruled unconstitutional, as Merriam-Webster points out.

Et tu, Webster's? Peter Weber

10:05 p.m. ET
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

During Monday's debate, Donald Trump defended his decision to not pay some contractors who worked for him on different projects.

Hillary Clinton told Trump she has met with dishwashers, painters, glass and marble installers, and other contractors who were "stiffed by you and your businesses." An architect that Clinton said designed the clubhouse for one of Trump's golf courses was in the audience at Hofstra University, and although the man built a "beautiful facility that was immediately put to use," Trump wouldn't pay him.

"Maybe he didn't do a good job and I was unsatisfied with his work," Trump interjected. Clinton said the workers deserved "some kind of apology from someone who has taken their labor, taken the goods they produced, then refused to pay them," adding that she was "relieved" her late father never did business with Trump. Trump responded by saying he does pay contractors and his "obligation right now is to do well for myself, my family, my employees, for my companies, and that's what I do." Trump added that he has plenty of workers who are "unbelievably happy and love me," then used the remainder of his time to plug his new hotel near the White House. "If I don't get there one way," he vowed, "I'll get to Pennsylvania Avenue another." Catherine Garcia

9:48 p.m. ET

At Monday's debate at Hofstra University, Donald Trump blamed Hillary Clinton for her husband's signing of NAFTA, saying she has ruined the economy over the past 30 years, when she was a first lady, senator, and secretary of state, and he also said she has been fighting the Islamic State "for your entire adult life." Clinton at one point quipped, "I have a feeling that by the end of the evening, I will be blamed for everything that's ever happened." Trump jumped in: "Why not?" "Why not, yeah, why not?" Clinton responded, laughing. "Just join the debate by saying more crazy things." Peter Weber

9:37 p.m. ET
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump got into their first heated exchange of the presidential debate in a fiery clash over the North American Free Trade Agreement. "You approved NAFTA," Trump interrupted Clinton, "which is the single worst trade deal ever approved."

Trump continued to charge Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, over NAFTA, to which Clinton snapped, "Donald, I know you live in your own reality, but that is not the facts."

But Trump wasn't letting anything go. Watch the candidates lock horns, below. Jeva Lange

Jeva Lange

9:34 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton didn't wait too long during Monday night's debate to use earlier comments made by Donald Trump during the Great Recession against him.

Trump, she said, was one of the "people who rooted for the housing crisis." In 2006, Clinton continued, Trump said, "'Gee, I hope it does collapse, because then I can go in and buy some and make some money.' Well, it did collapse." She was interrupted by Trump, who embraced his remarks, saying, "That's called business, by the way." Clinton finished her statement by reminding the audience that "nine million people lost their jobs, five million lost their homes, and $13 trillion in family wealth was wiped out" during the Great Recession. Catherine Garcia

9:28 p.m. ET

From the beginning of Monday's presidential debate, Hillary Clinton has referred to her Republican rival, Donald Trump, as "Donald." Trump, at least in the first few minutes, made a show of referring to Clinton as "Secretary Clinton." In a response about NAFTA, Trump said "Secretary Clinton — yes, is that okay? I want you to be very happy. It's very important to me."

Later, he called her "Hillary." Peter Weber

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