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April 5, 2017

For the first time since Gallup started asking about general approval or disapproval of the Affordable Care Act in November 2012, the 2010 health-care overhaul is viewed favorably by a majority of Americans, Gallup reported Tuesday. And the 55 percent approval number is all the more dramatic because just five months ago, only 42 percent of Americans approved of ObamaCare, versus 53 percent who disapproved.

The rise in approval comes from Democrats, Republicans, and especially independents, whose approval rose 17 points since President Trump's election, to 57 percent from 40 percent. So what changed in five months? "Trump vehemently attacked the Affordable Care Act during his presidential campaign — and in the days immediately following his election, the public appeared to agree with him," Gallup said. "However, in the five months since, as Republicans' efforts to replace the law with one of their own have failed to get off the ground, enough Americans have changed their minds about the ACA to create a majority favoring it for the first time."

Trump and House Republicans have started meeting again this week to try and reach agreement on their ObamaCare replacement bill, which House leaders pulled from an imminent vote when it became clear it would fail. According to a Kaiser Family Foundation survey released Tuesday, a 63 percent majority thinks it's a "good thing" that the bill, the American Health Care Act, crashed. Almost half of those people said it's good because the ACHA did not fully repeal ObamaCare, but 75 percent of respondents — including majorities of every group polled — said that given the choice, Trump and the GOP should try to make ObamaCare work rather than make it fail, as Trump has threatened to do.

The Kaiser Family Foundation found opinions about ObamaCare split evenly, with 46 percent in favor and opposed, and there's a pretty broad consensus on who is responsible for the Affordable Care Act going forward: A 61 percent majority say Trump and the GOP are responsible for any problems with the law, while 31 percent say former President Barack Obama and his party still own ObamaCare. You can find more results at the Kaiser Family Foundation. Peter Weber

10:44 a.m. ET

The Senate Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena for former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort to publicly testify at Wednesday's hearing on the ongoing Russia probe. Committee chairman Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and ranking member Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) confirmed Tuesday that they requested Manafort's participation after they were "unable to reach an agreement for a voluntary transcribed interview with the Judiciary Committee."

Manafort has agreed to a single interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee about his participation in the June 2016 meeting at Trump Tower with a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer, but his notes and comments would unavailable to the Judiciary Committee. Grassley and Feinstein said they may excuse Manafort from the hearing if he agrees to an interview.

Read the Senate Judiciary Committee's entire statement below. Becca Stanek

10:26 a.m. ET
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Arizona residents perusing their state's official driver's license manual will find new information on how to interact with law enforcement roadside — or, in the words of state Rep. Reginald Bolding (D), who helped add the language to the handbook, how to avoid getting shot by the cops.

"When you look at what's taken place across the country, you have seen a majority of individuals who are people of color that have had higher incidence of interactions with law-enforcement officers, particularly in shootings," Bolding, who is black, explains. "Hopefully we can get to a place where that's not the reality."

The idea to add this update to the manual was particularly inspired by the death of Philando Castile, the black motorist in Minnesota who was fatally shot by police during a traffic stop in front of his girlfriend and her young daughter. Bolding consulted with eight Arizona police departments and said he received eight different sets of conflicting advice. He ended up working with his state's departments of transportation and public safety to come up with something more consistent.

"I recognize this won't solve all officer-involved shootings," Bolding concedes. "I do hope that this could potentially save a life by giving a recommendation of what to do." You can read the resultant guidance beginning on page 56 of this PDF version of the manual. Bonnie Kristian

9:55 a.m. ET
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President Trump lambasted Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Twitter on Tuesday, and new White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci as well as incoming Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders each strongly suggested in interviews the same morning that Sessions' days in office are numbered.

Scaramucci was speaking with Hugh Hewitt when he said the radio host is "probably right" in his comment that "the president wants [Sessions] gone." "I don't want to speak for the president on that because he's a Cabinet official and I sort of think that has to be between the president of the United States and the Cabinet official," Scaramucci added, labeling Trump "obviously frustrated" with the situation.

Sanders was speaking on Fox & Friends when she made similar remarks. Trump's "frustration [with Sessions] certainly hasn't gone away," she said. "And you know, I don't think it will." Bonnie Kristian

9:17 a.m. ET
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People are not pleased that President Trump decided to unload the details of his electoral victory and political battles onto America's youth during his speech Monday night at the quadrennial Boy Scout Jamboree. In Trump's freewheeling speech before 30,000 Boy Scouts, he jokingly threatened a Republican senator and his Health and Human Services secretary over the ObamaCare repeal; criticized Hillary Clinton and former President Barack Obama; and pondered whether the "fake media" would miscount his "record-setting" crowd.

The official Boy Scouts of America Facebook page quickly filled up with comments expressing outrage and concern. "I have no problem with a president speaking to scouts but what occurred at Jamboree today was reprehensible ... One of the main concerns that leaders have is trying to recruit more scouts from minority communities; that effort was dealt a serious blow today," a father of three Scouts wrote. "As a Cub Scout den leader and mom of 2 scouts, I am livid," another commenter posted. "You owe all of us, especially the scouts who were present, a sincere apology and assurance that you are not okay with what happened."

Several other commenters demanded an apology and questioned how Trump's speech jives with Boy Scout values. "As the mother of two soon-to-be Eagles and the wife of an Eagle Scout, this man goes against everything scouting stands for," a commenter said. An Eagle Scout and 1985 Jamboree attendee posted that he was "still awaiting a statement denouncing the president's speech and his attempt to turn the BSA into the Trump Youth."

On Tuesday, Boy Scouts released a statement responding to the Trump backlash. "The Boy Scouts of America is wholly non-partisan and does not promote any one position, product, service, political candidate, or philosophy," the statement said. "The invitation for the sitting U.S. president to visit the National Jamboree is a long-standing tradition and is in no way an endorsement of any party or specific policies." Becca Stanek

8:30 a.m. ET
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Former House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) is confident that his party won't repeal and replace ObamaCare. "Here we are, seven months into this year, and yet they've not passed this bill. Now, they're never — they're not going to repeal and replace ObamaCare," Boehner said at a private event last week in Las Vegas, of which The Washington Post obtained video footage.

Boehner explained "the American people have gotten accustomed to" ObamaCare at this point, so he suggested that Republicans' best bet at rolling back the health-care law is just to chip away at its tax provisions and regulations. "When it's all said and done, you're not going to have an employer mandate anymore, you're not going to have the individual mandate," Boehner said. "The Medicaid expansion will be there. The governors will have more control over their Medicaid populations and how to get them care, and a lot of ObamaCare taxes will probably go."

Boehner readily acknowledged that Republican leadership might not appreciate his candid commentary, especially as they're poised to vote Tuesday afternoon on health care. Boehner recalled the last time he made waves, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) texted him, "Gee, thanks."

Read more of Boehner's insights — including his advice to President Trump — over at The Washington Post. Becca Stanek

8:16 a.m. ET
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In April, top U.S. military commanders strongly suggested that Russia has been arming the Afghan Taliban, whom the U.S. has been battling since 2001. On Tuesday, CNN presented footage it says backs up those claims. In the videos, two different Taliban factions show off weapons they claim were donated by Russia, in one case to a rival Taliban faction. The weapons — sniper rifles, heavy machine guns, and a variant of the Kalashnikov — have been scrubbed of any identifying marks. Russia has denied earlier reports that it is arming the Taliban.

In one video, a Taliban splinter group near Harat, in western Afghanistan, says the weapons it is displaying were seized from a mainstream Taliban group that attacked it. "These weapons were given to the fighters of Mullah Haibatullah by the Russians via Iran," said the faction's deputy leader, Mullah Abdul Manan Niazi. "The Russians are giving them these weapons to fight ISIS in Afghanistan, but they are using them against us too." The second Taliban group, near Kabul, said they were given the weapons at no cost across the border with Tajikistan, probably from "the Russians."

CNN asked weapons experts from the Small Arms Survey to examine the videos, and the experts said there was nothing concrete to tie the arms to Moscow, though the lack of any identifying marks in itself was a little suspect. "The Russians have said that they maintain contact with the Taliban, we have lots of other reports from other people they are arming the Taliban," Afghan government spokesman Sediq Sediqi tells CNN. "There is no smoke without fire." You can watch the videos and read more about the weapons at CNN. Peter Weber

7:56 a.m. ET

Morning Joe's Mika Brzezinski suggested Tuesday that President Trump's recent treatment of Attorney General Jeff Sessions isn't all that different from Trump's treatment of one of his greatest mortal enemies. "It feels like he's treating Sessions and many others along the way in this administration like Rosie O'Donnell," Brzezinski said.

Now, Trump has not called Sessions "crude, rude, obnoxious, and dumb" — all among the words he's used to describe O'Donnell in their decade-long insult battle. On Tuesday, however, Trump did call Sessions out on Twitter for his "VERY weak position on Hillary Clinton crimes." The day before, Trump labeled Sessions "beleaguered."

Morning Joe co-host Joe Scarborough contended that Trump's tweets indicate he's "still in that mindset" of his old days battling O'Donnell and "insulting each other back and forth." "It was just a media spectacle," Scarborough said. "He doesn't understand that when he's in Washington, D.C. and he is fighting his attorney general and he is fighting Bob Mueller and he is fighting James Comey that this isn't a media game."

When you're president you don't just "boost your ratings up," Scarborough quipped. "Even Rosie O'Donnell would say that — it's not a game," he added.

Watch it below. The O'Donnell comparison comes in around the 6:36 mark. Becca Stanek

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