Feature

Rangel and Hatch survive challenges

Sen. Orrin Hatch and Rep. Charles B. Rangel fought off primary challenges.

Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Rep. Charles B. Rangel (D-N.Y.) fought off primary challenges this week and will run as odds-on favorites to retain their seats in November. Rangel, 82, slowed by health problems and battered by ethics violations, ran in a redrawn district with a Latino majority, but managed to fend off four challengers to win the nomination for a 22nd term in Congress. Hatch, 78, a conservative six-term senator, was prepared for a Tea Party challenge and breezed to an easy victory. Hatch told supporters he was eager to take on divisive issues like Social Security, Medicare, and the national debt. “This is my last term,” Hatch said. “I’m ready to bite the bullet.” 

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