What is vocal fry?

Kim Kardashian does it. So did the ancient Mayans.

Kardashians
(Image credit: (Ethan Miller/Getty Images))

You may have heard of the hot new linguistic fad that's creeping into U.S. speech and undermining your job chances. Or maybe you know it as the debilitating speaking disorder afflicting North American women or the verbal tic of doom. It's called vocal fry, and it's the latest "uptalk" or "valleyspeak," AKA the "ditzy girl" speaking style that people love to hate.

Unlike uptalk, which is a rising intonation pattern, or valleyspeak, which covers a general grab bag of linguistic features, including vocabulary, vocal fry describes a specific sound quality caused by the movement of the vocal folds. In regular speaking mode, the vocal folds rapidly vibrate between a more open and more closed position as the air passes through. In vocal fry, the vocal folds are shortened and slack so they close together completely and pop back open, with a little jitter, as the air comes through. That popping, jittery effect gives it a characteristic sizzling or frying sound. (I haven't been able to establish that that's how fry got its name, but that's the story you hear most often.)

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