'Right to work' laws aren't about jobs or rights. They're about power.

Scott Walker's gambit is all about political spending

A protest in Michigan.
(Image credit: (REUTERS/Rebecca Cook))

A major plank of the conservative agenda these days is so-called "Right to Work" laws, something Scott Walker recently passed in Wisconsin. Such a law makes it illegal for an employer and a union to enter into a contract ensuring any new employee will be automatically enrolled in the union or its dues program. Conservatives often insist that this is neither a pro- nor an anti-labor position, but merely a question of individual liberty and economic growth. Unions are okay, they say, but justice requires that people not be "coerced" into joining a union just to get a job, which hurts workers' incomes by choking off growth.

This is a crock.

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