Donald Trump's rise and the echoes of 1968

Trump bears a passing similarity to George Wallace, the flamboyantly populist and demagogic former Alabama governor who ran for president in 1968

This election is brings back memories from 1968.
(Image credit: Illustration | Images courtesy of Mark Lyons/Getty Images, Everett Collection Inc / Alamy Stock Photo)

The 2016 presidential election featuring Donald Trump vs. Hillary Clinton might end up being as nasty as Thomas Jefferson's and John Adams' fierce face-off in 1800. (Team Jefferson accused Adams of having a "hideous hermaphroditical character," and the Adams camp ripped Jefferson as "the son of a half-breed Indian squaw, sired by a Virginia mulatto father." And so on.)

The 2016 election also might be as realigning as the election of 1828, when the Democratic-Republicans split over the power of banks and the federal government. The 2016 election may well change the way elections themselves operate, like in 1896, when William McKinley discovered the power of both regional media and big business fundraising.

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