In Rogue One, there is no dark or light side

Despite being boycotted viciously by Nazis, the movie reportedly takes a complicated view of, well, Nazis

Star Wars has always been mythical in stark and relatively simple terms. The original trilogy took the now-controversial position that the guys based on the Nazis — the ones who destroyed Princess Leia's home planet Alderaan just as a demonstration of the Death Star laser's power — were pretty uncomplicatedly bad. It trafficked in the archetypal psychodrama of fathers and sons. It subscribed to a now-obsolete American notion that a victory won in hatred is no victory at all. And if the prequels offered some complicating material, they did so by anticipating America's antihero craze and tracking, in dull and deadening detail, the reasons Darth Vader broke bad. But he did break bad: The vocabulary of the Jedi forces that distinction. There is evil, and there is good.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story is different. The first film of the Star Wars Anthology Series, hitting theaters Dec. 16, sidesteps this Jedi Manichaeism almost entirely.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us