Is protesting the new brunch?

How brunch went from a hipster joke to an activist mantra

Making political engagement as routine as eating a meal is a definite positive
(Image credit: SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

In October 2014, which might as well be another time continuum entirely, David Shaftel wrote an article for The New York Times titled "Brunch Is for Jerks." You may remember this glorious hate read, in which he lamented how brunch was over for him for an array of reasons: because he had a child now, because brunch is populated by a-holes, because the gentrifier-beloved meal is "the most visible symptom of a demographic shift that has taken place in our neighborhood and others like it." Brunch, he claimed — at least the brand of all-you-can-sip, table-dancing, Sex and the City-type brunches — was a signifier of a Peter Pan sort of lifestyle, never growing up to eat an actual meal, drinking all day long and into the night, eschewing schedules for decadence.

People responded in anger and agreement. Some of them may have been eating brunch at the time.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us