Death by deportation

ICE deported a Detroit man to Iraq, a place he had never visited. He died.

President Trump.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Zach Gibson/Getty Images, Immigration and Customs Enforcement/Handout via REUTERS, Julia_Khimich/iStock, str33tcat/iStock)

If you have Type 1 diabetes and cannot get insulin, you will eventually develop a condition called ketoacidosis. Your cells are unable to access the sugar in your blood, and so your body reverts to digesting its muscle and fat in a backup metabolism process — essentially, you start to starve because you can no longer process normal food. This in turn leads to a steady buildup of toxic acidic byproducts in the blood, which makes you deathly ill. You become severely dehydrated as your body attempts to dilute its sugar-saturated blood with all available water, and you gasp for breath as it tries to lower your blood's acidity by reducing the blood concentration of carbon dioxide (which is slightly acidic). Without treatment, you eventually develop cerebral edema, fall into a coma, and perish.

It's a gruesome, agonizing way to die. And it's almost certainly what Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials inflicted on a Detroit man named Jimmy Aldaoud by deporting him to Iraq, despite the fact that he was not born there, never lived there, had no money, spoke no Arabic, had both severe mental illness and diabetes, and indeed had been living in the U.S. since he was six months old. After living on the street for two and a half months, where he said he had been throwing up for lack of insulin, he died.

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