Why Republicans should admit there was a quid pro quo

What Trump was trying to do with Ukraine is obvious. That doesn't mean it was wrong.

President Trump.
(Image credit: Illustrated | SAUL LOEB/AFP via Getty Images, Shtrunts/iStock, Adam Bettcher/Getty Images, ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images, javarman3/iStock, NATALIIA OMELCHENKO/iStock, Microv)

Any discussion of Wednesday's impeachment hearings should begin with two acknowledgements.

First, regardless of what happens, no matter how many stories are written about the testimony of an ever-increasing number of witnesses with varying degrees of credibility or how dastardly the plot is made to sound on cable television and on the campaign trail, the result is going to be anticlimactic. Even if the current proceedings eventually lead to an up-or-down vote on impeachment (which is far from certain), the Republican-controlled Senate is not going to remove President Trump from office. As Matthew Continetti put it recently, it's like knowing what the score of a football game is going to be before the opening kickoff.

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