Biden's opportunity in Ethiopia

The African country is experiencing a humanitarian crisis. The new president should address it.

President Biden and Ethiopian migrants.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Getty Images, iStock, AP Images)

Americans are incurious at the best of times about the world around them. When our attention is taken up with domestic crises, real or imagined, we are the most insular people on the planet. As we stitched together fantasies of insurrection and civil war this month, the people of Ethiopia continued to experience the reality.

Fighting between government forces and a former political party based in the Tigray region has been ongoing since late last year. On November 4, Abiy Ahmed, the country's prime minister and the winner of last year's Nobel Peace Prize, suspended power, internet, and phone service throughout the region. This has made it almost impossible for news agencies to report accurately, but we still have a broad idea of what is going on: a humanitarian crisis with millions of people displaced and starving as foreign aid is effectively blocked by government forces in cooperation with the military of neighboring Eritrea.

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