Rush Limbaugh taught Republicans to rage

The pioneer of Donald Trump's grievance politics

Rush Limbaugh.
(Image credit: Illustrated | iStock, REUTERS)

It is said that we should not speak ill of the dead. But how should one remark on the life of a man who made hundreds of millions of dollars mocking and demeaning the dead and the dying?

On Wednesday, Rush Limbaugh, America's most famous radio personality and rabble rouser, died at the age of 70 from complications of lung cancer. For more than three decades on "The Rush Limbaugh Show," Limbaugh, now being gently hailed by even such places as The New York Times as the "voice of conservative America," used his airwaves to spew vitriol and hate, all the while pushing the Republican Party, with the help of Fox News, to the extreme right where it now simmers. His tirades, tantrums, and trolling, once unique, became standard operating procedure for an entire conservative media ecosystem that arose in the same years — and for a Republican Party that replaced its once-held belief in good governance with an oversized sense of white grievance as its driving impulse.

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