Clarence Thomas and the enigma of social media

The Supreme Court justice identifies how imperfect our assessment of social media really is

Clarence Thomas.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Getty Images, iStock)

America owes Clarence Thomas an expression of gratitude.

In a 12-page concurrence to an opinion dismissing a case growing out of Donald Trump's decision to block certain people from reading his Twitter account while president, Thomas has raised a series of sweeping questions about the nature of social media and how we treat it legally and philosophically. His answers to these questions are mostly wrong. But that doesn't mean his arguments should be dismissed. On the contrary, we're in his debt for helping to clarify just how novel social media really is — and how imperfectly our thinking and existing law applies to it and the dilemmas it poses to our body politic.

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