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January 28, 2019

The longest government shutdown in history may have ended, but its damage to the economy is far from over.

Throughout the 35-day shutdown prompted by President Trump's demand for border wall funding, 800,000 federal employees went unpaid and six government departments went unfunded. That cost the American economy $11 billion, $3 billion of which will never be recovered, an analysis released Monday by the Congressional Budget Office reveals.

The nonpartisan CBO calculated that the shutdown caused a federal discretionary spending to drop $18 billion in a little over a month. That led the GDP in the last quarter of 2018 to drop by $3 billion, or .1 percent. The GDP in the first quarter of 2019 is then expected to drop another $8 billion, or .2 percent, per the report. That GDP drop will mostly rebound by the end of fiscal year 2019, but an estimated .02 percent of America's annual GDP will not , the CBO says.

Beyond the impact of federal government spending losses, the CBO also noted "much more significant effects on individual businesses and workers." About 800,000 federal workers didn't receive paychecks for five weeks, and federal contractors won't receive any at all. That caused them to spend less at "private-sector entities," some of which "will never recoup that lost income," the report says.

A separate CBO economic outlook report released Monday also found that, if taxation and spending remains unchanged, the federal deficit will grow to an annual total of $1 trillion in next decade. Read more about it at The Week. Kathryn Krawczyk

5:46 p.m.

We knew this day would come.

Supernatural stars Jensen Ackles, Jared Padalecki, and Misha Collins announced on Friday via Instagram that the show will come to an end after its 15th season. From their red eyes, it was clear the three actors had been crying over the news — which they had just broken to the crew before taking to social media.

"Well, it's official. One more round for the Winchester brothers," Padalecki wrote in his instagram caption. "Though nothing ever really ends in Supernatural ... does it?"

The series is currently in its 14th season and recently celebrated its 300th episode in November, reports E! News. Supernatural was renewed for a 15th season at the beginning of the year with no hint of the show ending soon, but after 20 episodes in the next season, it'll all be over.

"For us it has been an experience of a lifetime," said executive producers Robert Singer and Andrew Dabb in a joint statement. "It is now most important to us to give these characters that we love the send off they deserve."

Saying goodbye is never an easy task. But with streaming services like Netflix and Hulu, is it really goodbye? Amari Pollard

Amari Pollard

5:35 p.m.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller has finished his report, but hardly anyone knows what's in it.

The Department of Justice announced Friday afternoon that Mueller had finished his investigation into potential ties between President Trump's campaign and Russian election interference. Attorney General William Barr similarly told the House and Senate Judiciary committees he had received the report Friday — and said he might tell them what's in it "as soon as this weekend."

In a letter to the committees on Friday, Barr said that Mueller faced "no such instances" where he was blocked from taking an action he wanted to pursue. There had been concerns that President Trump would not submit to in-person questioning by Mueller, but if this was something Mueller attempted, it was seemingly not blocked.

"Only a few people" have seen the report so far, a Department of Justice official told CNN's Shimon Prokupecz after its conclusion. Barr has refused to commit to releasing the whole report to the public or even to Congress, but he said in his Friday letter that he may have Mueller's "principle conclusions" ready for the judiciary committee "as soon as this weekend." Barr continued to say that he would "consult with" Mueller and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein "to determine what other information can be released to Congress and the public," and added that he "remain[s] committed to as much transparency as possible."

Read Barr's whole letter to Congress below. Kathryn Krawczyk

5:10 p.m.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's report is done.

Mueller finished his investigation into potential ties between President Trump's campaign and Russian election interference, the Justice Department said on Friday. The confidential report was delivered to Attorney General William Barr, who has said he will provide a condensed version of the report to Congress. He has not committed to releasing the full report to Congress or the public.

The Washington Post's Ellen Nakashima first reported that the House Judiciary Committee was told to expect notification by 5 p.m. Friday that Mueller had finished the report. Reports had surged in the last few weeks that Mueller was wrapping up his report, and reporters staking out his office chalked up several reasons to predict it would wrap Friday. Kathryn Krawczyk

5:06 p.m.

The mayor of San Juan who outspokenly criticized the Trump administration's response to a hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico announced she will run for governor in 2020.

Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz announced her bid on Friday, telling an audience in Puerto Rico it is time to "break away from the chains that tie us down in order to have a promising future and break our cycle of poverty," reports NBC News.

Cruz rose to national prominence after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017. When President Trump called the response to the hurricane "incredible," Cruz responded by saying "Where have you been?" and lambasting the Trump administration's slow response to supplying emergency aid. Trump has criticized Cruz for being "nasty" and reflecting "poor" leadership.

She hasn't only criticized Trump, though — in her announcement, she also criticized current Gov. Ricardo Rosselló, who she said "was unable to count deaths after Hurricane Maria" and "stood by Trump when he threw paper towels at people."

Cruz is running as a member of the Popular Democratic Party, which opposes statehood for Puerto Rico, per NBC News. Marianne Dodson

5:04 p.m.

Jordan Peele's Us is about to tear up the box office — and accomplish a feat that has become depressingly rare.

The latest film from the director of Get Out is set to be one of the few movies not based on anything to top the box office since 2017, observes IndieWire's David Ehrlich. As he points out, the only films in the past two years that were original stories and beat the competition were Get Out, Dunkirk, Coco, The Hitman's Bodyguard, Happy Death Day, and Night School.

In that time, just about everything else has been a sequel, a reboot, or a film set in a cinematic universe, plus movies based on real people (although technically, Dunkirk is also based on a real event, so Us would be seventh if this were included). Thus far in 2019, the films that have debuted at number one include three films based on a comic book or manga, three sequels, and one remake.

At the moment, Us is projected to make about $64 million over the weekend, per The Hollywood Reporter, which would make it the biggest opening ever for an original R-rated horror film. Clearly, the horror genre has played a major role in keeping audacious, original movies alive at the box office, making up half of Ehrlich's list — with two being helmed by Peele himself. Screenwriter C. Robert Cargill observed on Friday that horror is "the last genre you can make $100 million in while discussing smartly the problems that plague both the individual and our society." After the success of Us, expect Peele to show back up on the list many more times in the years to come. Brendan Morrow

4:41 p.m.

Floodwaters in Mozambique are now visible from outer space in what has the potential to become one of the region's deadliest weather disasters.

Extreme flooding has formed an inland ocean in central Mozambique, reports CNN, and entire villages and towns have been overwhelmed by the rising waters.

As many as 400 bodies line the banks of the coastal city of Beira, per CNN, where nearby villages were completely submerged by the flooding.

There have been at least 200 confirmed deaths in Mozambique since Cyclone Idai tore through the country last weekend. Actual death counts are estimated to top 1,000, with more than 400,000 people having lost their homes.

The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies said the humanitarian needs in the region will "only deepen" in the future, reports CNN. Marianne Dodson

3:54 p.m.

NASA's astronauts are doing a bit of spring cleaning and upgrading.

Two astronauts, Anne McClain and Nick Hague spent their Friday swapping out dead batteries on the International Space Station in the first of two scheduled spacewalks this month, NASA announced. The battery-wielding duo upgraded three of six nickel-hydrogen batteries that had lost their juice after a long run in space, according to NASA.

"Just like your rechargeable batteries at home, eventually over time, they're not going to recharge as well," Kenny Todd, the missions operations manager for the ISS, said during a press conference, per The Verge. "They're not going to hold as much charge when it comes to putting loads on them." The batteries were replaced with newer, more powerful lithium-ion versions during the 6-hour-long spacewalk.

There will be a second round of battery replacements next week during NASA's first-ever all-female spacewalk with Christina Koch and McClain.

The expedition was the first spacewalk for McClain and Hague, but the 214th overall, says NASA. Watch footage of the swap below, via USA Today. Tatyana Bellamy-Walker

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