Hillary Clinton zings President Trump for citing dubious study about 2016 election manipulation

Hillary Clinton.
(Image credit: Brian Ach/Getty Images)

If you've been missing the battle between President Trump and his 2016 election opponent Hillary Clinton, don't worry, the show rebooted for a day.

On Monday morning, after — surprise, surprise — watching a segment on Fox News, Trump claimed a new report had revealed that Google manipulated between 2.6 million and 16 million votes for Clinton in 2016, which would mean his victory was actually larger than the margin he usually boasts about. Clinton didn't take long to strike back with a zinger, however.

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Ouch.

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Now, what exactly are Clinton and Trump referring to? The Washington Post's Philip Bump explains that Fox Business aired a segment discussing testimony offered to the Senate last month in which psychologist Robert Epstein said that his research suggested Google had aided in handing Clinton somewhere in the range of 2.6 and 10.4 million votes, with 15 million votes being the possible shift in 2020. Epstein reportedly wasn't actually alleging that Google had "manipulated" votes in the literal sense. Instead, his disputed and, as Bump notes, ill-defined study indicated that pro-Clinton bias in Google's search results could have affected votes. Read more at The Washington Post. Tim O'Donnell

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