Russia banned from use of its name, flag, or anthem at next 2 Olympics after doping scandal

The Olympic rings are seen on the facade of the Russian Olympic Committee (ROC) building in Moscow on December 05, 2017.
(Image credit: Getty Images)

Russia was banned Thursday from the use of its "name, flag and anthem" at the next two Olympics, The Associated Press reports.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport announced this ruling on Thursday, which came following Russia's violation of doping rules through what regulators have described as "one of the most sophisticated doping schemes in the history of international sports," Axios writes.

The ruling said Russia can't use its name, flag, or anthem not only at the next two Olympics but also any world championship for two years, and Russia can't bid to host major sports events for two years either, AP reports. Russian athletes who aren't linked to the scandal "will still be allowed to compete at events, but only as neutrals," The New York Times reports. The court said their uniforms can only have "Russia" on them if "Neutral Athlete" or "Neutral Team" is written equally prominently.

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Previously, the World Anti-Doping Agency announced a four-year ban for Russia over the doping scandal. But the Russian Anti-Doping Agency appealed to the Court of Arbitration for Sport, and Thursday's decision reduced that length to two years, The Washington Post reports. The Switzerland court's three-judge panel said that while "the consequences which the panel has decided to impose are not as extensive as those sought by WADA," this shouldn't "be read as any validation of the conduct of RUSADA or the Russian authorities."

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