Late night hosts explain why Senate Republicans should vote to convict Trump, explore why they won't

Late night comedians wrap up Trump impeachment
(Image credit: Screenshot/YouTube/The Late Show)

House Democrats wrapped up their impeachment case against former President Donald Trump on Thursday, and their videos and other evidence "make it pretty obvious that Trump incited the rioters," Trevor Noah said on Thursday's Daily Show. "They were wearing Trump hats, carrying Trump flags, and they all just watched Trump speak, and they are chanting 'Fight for Trump!'"

"I mean, if one guy stormed the Capitol because he thought you said it to him, maybe you can just blame him," Noah said. "If an entire stadium of people misunderstood you in the exact same way, I don't know, man, that sh-t's on you. But if there's one theme of this trial, aside from Trump being super guilty, it's Republican senators not caring that Trump is super guilty." Seriously, he said, "these senators are a jury for a trial of the president, but instead they're acting like bored middle schoolers."

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Peter Weber, The Week US

Peter has worked as a news and culture writer and editor at The Week since the site's launch in 2008. He covers politics, world affairs, religion and cultural currents. His journalism career began as a copy editor at a financial newswire and has included editorial positions at The New York Times Magazine, Facts on File, and Oregon State University.