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Huh?
July 11, 2014
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The Journal of Vibration and Control has retracted 60 articles at once, citing a "peer review and citation ring" as "rigging the review process" to get articles published, according to The Washington Post.

The journal, which covers "vibration phenomena and their control," is a part of the SAGE Publishers group of academic publications. In a statement from SAGE describing the scandal, the publisher explains that "fabricated identities" were used in its SAGE Track system, where scholars review each others' work before publication.

Ali H. Nayfeh, former editor-in-chief of the Journal of Vibration and Control, learned of the situation in 2013. The JVC then began a 14-month investigation into the false identities and fake email addresses of the SAGE system's reviewers. The Washington Post reports there were as many as 130 aliases in the system.

The investigation focused on Peter Chen, a researcher at the National Pingtung University of Education in Taiwan. The SAGE statement accused Chen of reviewing his own paper under one of the false identities. According to SAGE, Chen has now resigned from his post at the university.

Each of the 60 articles that JVC retracted have at least one reviewer or author "who has been implicated in the peer review" ring, SAGE said in a statement. Meghan DeMaria

Awwww
11:35 a.m. ET

A Florida judge had one unusual question for the burglary suspect in her bond court: Did you go to middle school with me?

Arthur Booth, 49, was arrested in Hialeah on charges of burglary, grand theft, fleeing, and resisting arrest, NBC 6 South Florida reports. Judge and former middle school classmate Mindy Glazer's question shocked him. He immediately teared up, held his head, and repeated "Oh my goodness."

Glazer had some encouraging words for the man she called "the nicest kid in middle school."

"Good luck to you sir," she said. "I hope you are able to come out of this OK and just lead a lawful life."

Watch the full encounter below. Julie Kliegman

Cuba Libre
11:05 a.m. ET
Matthew Hinton/AFP/Getty Images

JetBlue ran its first official direct flight from New York City's John F. Kennedy Airport to Havana's José Martí International Airport on Friday, the first in a planned series of weekly charter flights.

It's the first major airline to do so, though smaller outfit Sun Country was the first to start servicing the two cities, Time reports.

JetBlue also runs flights to Cuba from Florida cities following the easing of travel restrictions earlier this year as the two nations work to restore diplomatic ties after half a century without relations. Julie Kliegman

downvote
10:45 a.m. ET
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Reddit users shut down hundreds of the site's sub-sections Friday following the alleged removal of Victoria Taylor, the online discussion board's director of talent and supervisor of the popular Ask Me Anything function connecting Redditors with famous people, Mashable reports. Moderators, often Reddit community members as opposed to employees, set subreddits to private in protest.

"I want to apologize to our community for yesterday," interim CEO Ellen Pao told Time on Friday. "We handled the transition in a way that caused some disruption, and we should have done a better job."

The site appointed staff member Kristen Fasnacht to communicate with subreddit moderators. Julie Kliegman

nukes
8:40 a.m. ET
Christian Bruner/AFP/Getty Images

Iran has reached a tentative agreement with the U.S. and five other world powers, anonymous diplomats told The Associated Press on Saturday. The deal, which hasn't yet been officially signed, is expected to relieve some international economic sanctions on Iran in exchange for curbing their nuclear program over the next decade

Negotiators face a July 7 deadline, extended from June 30 after more than a year of talks. Iran Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said in a YouTube video Friday negotiations had "never been closer to a lasting outcome." Julie Kliegman

terrorism
7:52 a.m. ET
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Governors and law enforcement officials are increasing security Saturday in light of State Department warnings of a heightened risk for a July Fourth terrorist attack, CNN reports. Authorities didn't have one specific threat to highlight, but are especially mindful of any attacks from suspected ISIS supporters in the country.

In particular, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday he is upping security statewide for various holiday-related events.

"We are keenly aware that New York State remains a top target for terrorists," he said. Julie Kliegman

Only in America
July 3, 2015
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A Little Rock, Arkansas, man lodged a complaint with the local NBC affiliate over its peacock logo, charging it included "colors of gays" to show support for the Supreme Court's same-sex marriage ruling. Don Stair said the logo was "a disgrace" and vowed to switch to ABC. The station responded that its multicolored NBC peacock — which dates from 1956 — is the "same logo as always." The Week Staff

This is sad
July 3, 2015

As America continues its slow, miserable climb out of the 2008 recession, wage stagnation is becoming a bigger concern. On Thursday, the Bureau of Labor Statistics' jobs report showed that wage growth effectively remains flat. It's a trend that has actually defined most of the 21st century — and, at least in comparison to one particularly well-off group, the depressingly slow growth of worker compensation goes back further still:

(Economic Policy Institute)

Since 1978, CEO compensation has risen 90 times faster than the average worker's, the liberal Economic Policy Institute shows in the above graph. That's not CEO pay vs. worker pay; that's just rates of growth.

The average CEO made $1.5 million, after adjusting for inflation, in 1978, EPI says. He or she now makes $16.3 million. The salary of the average worker, however, has risen from $48,000 to just $53,200. CEOs at top firms now make over 300 times more than the average worker. Nico Lauricella

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