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May 2, 2014
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Pay phones — once so vital, and now just a place for weird bacteria to grow — might be useful once again in New York City, if Mayor Bill de Blasio has his way.

On Thursday, de Blasio announced that the city has issued a request for proposals to create internet hot spots out of old pay phone booths, in a bid to bring free Wi-Fi to Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, the Bronx, and Staten Island. This isn't the first time NYC has contemplated turning telephone booths into hot spots, TIME reminds us; Mayor Michael Bloomberg launched a pilot project that fizzled out.

"For years, the question was, 'What to do with pay phones?' and now we have an answer," de Blasio said in a statement. "By using a historic part of New York's street fabric, we can significantly enhance public availability of increasingly vital broadband access, invite new and innovative digital services, and increase revenue to the city — all at absolutely no cost to taxpayers."

Right now, 84 percent of pay phone kiosks are controlled by three companies, but their contracts are set to expire this year. De Blasio would like new contracts to be issued for "the installation, operation, and maintenance of up to 10,000 public communication points distributed across the five boroughs." The new and improved booths would not only provide Wi-Fi, but also contain free cell phone charging stations and interactive touch screens with information on local attractions. The city says that the new franchise would produce $17.5 million in annual revenue by the end of June 2026, with potential franchisees including Verizon Wireless and AT&T. Catherine Garcia

10:27 a.m. ET

President Trump announced on Twitter Saturday morning he is no longer willing to host the Golden State Warriors at the White House, a traditional way to honor their NBA championship victory, because of comments from point guard Stephen Curry:

Trump's tweet comes hours after Curry on Friday told reporters he did not wish to meet the president, alluding to Trump's much-criticized responses to the white nationalist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

"You can talk about all the different personalities that have said things and done things — from [Colin] Kaepernick to what happened with [Michael] Bennett to all sorts of examples of what has gone on in our country that has led to change," Curry said. "We're all trying to do what we can using our platforms, using our opportunities, to shed light on that. That's kind of where I stand on that. I don't think us going to the White House will miraculously make everything better, but this is my opportunity to voice that."

This is Trump's second clash with professional athletes this weekend. Friday night, he told a campaign rally crowd that NFL players like Kaepernick, who has knelt during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice, should be fired. "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now?" Trump said. Bonnie Kristian

8:54 a.m. ET
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As-yet unidentified tremors were detected in North Korea early Saturday near the site of previous nuclear weapons tests. While China labeled the 3.4 magnitude quake a "suspected explosion" that could be Pyongyang's second nuclear test in a matter of weeks, an official from South Korea's meteorological agency said initial assessments indicate it was more likely a natural earthquake. North Korea has not commented either way.

On Friday, North Korea's foreign minister, Ri Yong Ho, said his government might test a hydrogen bomb over the Pacific Ocean. "This could probably mean the strongest hydrogen bomb test over the Pacific Ocean," Ri announced. "Regarding which measures to take, I don't really know since it is what Kim Jong Un does."

Also Friday, President Trump once again called North Korean leader Kim Jong Un "Rocket Man," the latest in a series of insults the two men have traded this week. Bonnie Kristian

8:37 a.m. ET

President Trump issued a profane call to NFL team owners to fire players who engage in peaceful political protest on the field while speaking Friday night at an Alabama rally for Sen. Luther Strange (R). "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a bitch off the field right now?" Trump asked his audience. "Out. He's fired. He's fired." The rally crowd responded with cheers.

"You know what's hurting the game?" the president continued. "When people like yourselves turn on television and you see those people taking the knee when they're playing our great national anthem." Trump encouraged his supporters to walk out of the stadium in counter-protest should they ever observe an NFL player's protest in person.

Trump was referring to football players like Colin Kaepernick, formerly of the Seattle Seahawks, who has silently declined to stand for the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice in America.

Trump's comments were widely decried, including by other NFL players, with many noting his words for Kaepernick were harsher than his responses to the white nationalist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. The NFL Players Association issued a statement Saturday vowing to "never back down when it comes to protecting the constitutional rights of our players as citizens as well as their safety."

Watch an excerpt of Trump's comments below, or see the entire speech here. Bonnie Kristian

8:09 a.m. ET

President Trump spoke Friday night at a primary campaign rally in Alabama for Sen. Luther Strange (R), who is in a runoff to retain the seat to which he was appointed after it was vacated by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Trump endorsed Strange while publicly worrying about damage to his own image should his candidate lose Tuesday's vote. "I'll be honest, might have made a mistake," Trump mused, adding that he will support Strange's opponent, Judge Roy Moore, should he win.

Trump used the occasion to slam Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) for his "terrible, honestly terrible" role in defeating the latest GOP health-care proposal, and to mention his much-promised border wall, which in this latest telling will be see-through, will only cover part of the border, and will keep drugs out of America. "You don't need [the wall] all the way," Trump said, promising to build "as much wall as we need."

The president also reused his "Rocket Man" nickname for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, whom Trump said "should have been handled a long time ago" by former President Bill Clinton. "This shouldn't be handled now," Trump continued. "But I'm going to handle it because we have to handle it. Little Rocket Man. We're going to do it. Because we really have no choice."

Watch Trump's speech in its entirety below. Bonnie Kristian

September 22, 2017
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If your art collection has outgrown your wall space, closet those canvases and install the Depict Frame ($899), a 49-inch screen fashioned like a framed painting. Though it's not the first digital canvas — Samsung's Frame TV also displays art — the image here is superior. Color-­calibrated and coated with a matte finish, the 4K UHD screen is optimized for displaying fine art in sharp detail. Using an app, you can cycle through images in Depict's collection, to which new pieces are added each month. For $20 a month, you can upload your own works, and that subscription also grants access to a curated collection of thousands of paintings. The Week Staff

September 22, 2017

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Sen. John McCain's (R-Ariz.) friendship won't be ending over a difference of opinion on the Graham-Cassidy health-care bill. Shortly after McCain announced Friday that he would vote against Graham's effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare, Graham tweeted that he respected McCain's opinion, though he disagrees with it:

Graham proceeded to lay out his case for the bill, which he's angling for Republicans to vote on next week:

He ended his series of tweets with a vow to "press on."

Three 'no' votes would kill the bill, and McCain is the second Republican, following Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), to oppose it. Republicans have until Sept. 30 to pass the bill by a simple majority vote. Becca Stanek

September 22, 2017

On any given day, Washington, D.C.'s utility company, Pepco, spends its time concerned about things like power outages and power lines — certainly not domesticated rodents. All that changed when 8-year-old Serenity wrote the company with a "firm, straightforward request" for a hamster, NBC Washington reports.

Serenity had made the understandable mistake of mixing up Pepco with Petco, the pet supply company. She promised in her letter to work extra hard at school and around the house if she could get the pet. "Lest her point be missed, at the bottom of the letter, she drew a hamster that took up half the page," NBC Washington writes.

Despite not exactly being in the hamster business, Pepco decided to surprise Serenity on Friday. Take a look at the photos below. Jeva Lange

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