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April 4, 2014

During Thursday night's Late Show with David Letterman, the host announced that after 5,914 shows alongside bandleader and sidekick Paul Shaffer, he will retire sometime in 2015.

Not knowing whether or not it was a joke, the audience remained silent until Letterman quipped, "What this means now is that Paul and I can be married."

Letterman said that he discussed his decision earlier in the day with CBS head Leslie Moonves; he then thanked everyone, from the staff at The Late Show to the audience at home, for being part of the ride. Watch the entire announcement below. --Catherine Garcia

2:49 p.m. ET

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus wouldn't be thrown by Michael Bloomberg entering the presidential race as an independent. In fact, he thinks it could help his party, telling CNN's Wolf Blitzer it's "no skin off our back."

"Yeah, I don't really view it as a third party, I just view it as another Democrat," Priebus said Wednesday. "So you get two Democrats running and splitting their vote."

Priebus then cited some well-known actions of the former New York City mayor.

"He's been fighting and pounding away at Republicans for how long now?" Priebus said. "He wants to take all the guns away, he wants to tax Slurpees and sodas. The guy's a liberal Democrat."

Watch Priebus' full segment below. Julie Kliegman

2:07 p.m. ET
ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images

As part of Amazon's ongoing quest to run every aspect of your life, the tech giant is testing a free sommelier consultation service. Customers can leave their number between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. and wait for a call from a licensed professional who can talk them through buying wine on Amazon, The Wall Street Journal reports.

For now, the service is only available in Japan, but Business Insider speculates Amazon will make the option available elsewhere. Julie Kliegman

1:42 p.m. ET
Mark Wilson/Getty Image

Ben Carson evacuated New Hampshire hours before the primary, leaving his own election party to revel without him. Only, there wasn't actually much reveling: Beating only Jim Gilmore, Carson skidded into a dismal eighth place, which doesn't do much to stoke a celebratory spirit.

Consequently, the party was a bit of a bust. It peaked with 50 attendees and while the campaign had optimistically set up two bars, "neither was inundated," The Guardian reports. Even worse, "A woman working behind one [of the bars] spent much of her time knitting a blanket."

Carson's campaign manager, Bob Dees, stressed that there is no cause for concern. "We didn't throw the kitchen sink in here. He'll perform very well in South Carolina. He could easily be in the top three and above in South Carolina. He could easily win in South Carolina," Dees said. Jeva Lange

1:22 p.m. ET

Gov. Chris Christie (R-N.J.) is reportedly suspending his presidential bid as early as Wednesday, after weak showings in both Iowa and New Hampshire. Media mogul Rupert Murdoch was ready with an uncouth analysis of the news:

The victim he references, surely, is Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who came in fifth place in Tuesday's New Hampshire primary, just days after Christie steamrolled him for repeating himself in a presidential debate. Julie Kliegman

1:09 p.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With Rand Paul out of the running, the Kentucky senator's former campaign manager is joining up with another Republican presidential candidate: Florida Sen. Marco Rubio. Both Paul and Rubio's campaigns confirmed Wednesday that Chip Englander will now serve as a senior political adviser for the Midwest to Rubio's campaign. Paul suspended his presidential bid last week.

The announcement follows Rubio's disappointing fifth-place finish in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday after a shaky performance in the Granite State's GOP debate Saturday. With the addition of Englander to the team, Rubio's campaign hopes to capitalize on his connections to Paul's supporters. Becca Stanek

12:55 p.m. ET

Come for cardboard crowns and mediocre burgers, stay for the hot dogs? Burger King is adding wieners to its menu, Fortune reports.

"It's so obvious," said Alex Macedo' Burger King's president of North America operations. "I don't know why we didn't do this before."

There will be a classic beef hot dog for $1.99, or, if you want to splurge, there's a $2.99 chili cheese hot dog available.

Macedo told Fortune he wants the addition to become "the Whopper of hot dogs," but it all seems irrelevant in a world where Burger King has chicken fries. Julie Kliegman

12:26 p.m. ET
Sarah Rice/Getty Images

A top investigator in the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan announced Tuesday that, depending on how the investigation pans out, state and county officials could face charges as serious as manslaughter.

"We're here to investigate what possible crimes there are, anything [from] involuntary manslaughter or death that may have happened to some young person or old person because of this poisoning, to misconduct in office," said Todd Flood, the special counsel for the state attorney general's office and leader of the Flint investigation. "We take this very seriously."

Flood says investigators will be looking to see if officials committed "gross negligence" or a "breach of duty" in the decision to change the city's water source as a cost-cutting measure and the subsequent handling of the city drinking water's high levels of lead. He also noted that the investigation could reveal officials' response to the issue could simply be a result of "honest mistakes."

Since the city switched water sources in April 2014, cases of Legionnaires' disease have increased, with nine cases being deadly. High lead levels in children's blood has also raised concerns about permanent neurological damage. Becca Stanek

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