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Bridgegate
March 28, 2014
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New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie (R) on Friday announced the resignation of David Samson, the chairman of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, who became the latest casualty in the scandal surrounding the closure of several lanes of the George Washington Bridge in late 2013.

The move comes a day after Christie's internal inquiry into the scandal cleared Christie of any wrongdoing in Bridgegate. (Shocker, we know.) The most curious part of Team Christie's review was the fact that Samson was never interviewed, despite the fact that the Port Authority is in charge of operating the bridge.

At his Friday presser, Christie explained that Samson — who has denied involvement in Bridgegate — had considered stepping down long ago. Why? "He's 74 years old and he's tired," Christie said.

Christie's recent flurry of activity — which included an interview with ABC's Diane Sawyer — has been seen as an attempt to put the scandal behind him. Indeed, the presser was something of a return to form for the governor, who tangled with reporters with gusto. But with Samson resigning so quickly after the release of an internal review that conspicuously excluded his input, Christie may have raised more questions than he answered. Ryu Spaeth

scary
6:46 p.m. ET

On Thursday, six people were stabbed at the annual gay pride parade in Jerusalem, and two are believed to be in serious condition.

The suspect, Yishai Shlissel, is in police custody, Mashable reports. He is the same man who stabbed three people at the gay pride parade in 2005, and was convicted of attempted murder. He was sentenced to 12 years in prison, but served 10 and was released three weeks ago.

Calling the attack a "most grave incident," Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel would "mete out justice to those responsible for the act. In the state of Israel, freedom of choice of the individual is one of the basic values. We must ensure that in Israel every man and woman will live in security whichever way they choose to live." Before the event, organizers told Haaretz they expected about 5,000 people to attend the parade. Because of threats from protesters, there were several police officers on the scene. Catherine Garcia

'first world problems?'
3:37 p.m. ET
Adam Bettcher/Stringer/Getty Images

The death of Cecil the lion — an animal supposedly beloved by the people of Zimbabwe — had many people in the capital city of Harare scratching their heads over the uproar in America.

"You are saying that all this noise is about a dead lion? Lions are killed all the time in this country," a used-clothes hawker on the streets of Harare told Reuters. "What's so special about this one?"

"It's so cruel, but I don't understand the whole fuss, there are so many pressing issues in Zimbabwe — we have water shortages, no electricity, and no jobs — yet people are making noise about a lion?" another resident of Harare, Eunice Vhunise, told The Chicago Tribune. "I saw Cecil once when I visited the game park. I will probably miss him. But honestly the attention is just too much."

Even the acting information minister of Zimbabwe, Prisca Mupfumira, was confused.

"What lion?" he said when asked for a comment. Jeva Lange

RBG and BIG
3:31 p.m. ET
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When Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg first heard her nickname, Notorious RBG, she had no idea where it came from.

"I will admit that I had to be told by my law clerks, what's this Notorious," Ginsburg confessed last July. Since then, Ginsburg has been studying up on the legendary late rapper Notorious B.I.G., and she proudly showed off what she learned Wednesday night at a Duke University School of Law event. The hip-hop artist has more in common with the Supreme Court justice than one would think, she said: "Both of us were born and raised in Brooklyn," Ginsburg told the audience. Becca Stanek

where are they now?
3:18 p.m. ET
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Former major league baseball DH Jose Canseco plans to dress like a woman in an attempt at solidarity with Caitlyn Jenner. Canseco's performance will be documented in his internet reality show, Spend a Day with Jose, and TMZ reports that the former Bash Brother will be golfing, playing softball, and going bowling "as a woman" for the seven days his project lasts.

"Move over, Caitlyn," Canseco — who is not transgender — tweeted Thursday morning.

It appears Canseco is, at least, well-intentioned: "In the beginning, I didn't understand [Jenner's transition], so I was kind of, like, against it," he told the New York Daily News. "Once I watched it more and more, and realized what it really entailed, what he was going through, I started supporting him." Jeva Lange

i guess that's why they call it game hunting
2:47 p.m. ET

A Minnesotan dentist isn't the only one wreaking havoc on the wildlife of Africa. Enter: Donald Trump's sons.

In a video that wont be posted here for its upsetting content, the younger Trumps, Eric and Donald Jr., are shown posing with their mammalian (and reptilian) trophies, whom they killed during their time on an African hunting safari.

Back in 2012, these pictures got a lot of people pretty upset. Trump Jr. responded to the outcries on Twitter:

Admittedly, that is a little difficult to decipher — but it would seem Trump Jr. believed he'd done everyone a favor. Jeva Lange

not as fun in real life
2:03 p.m. ET

High-speed police chases may look really cool in movies, but the reality is a whole lot uglier, according to USA Today. Their study reports that between 1979 and 2013, 11,506 people were killed in police chases — over 5,000 of whom were innocent bystanders.

The rate of high-speed chase fatalities is actually so high that, on average, they're responsible for the death of nearly one person a day. By comparison, one person a day on average is shot to death by the police, according to an FBI estimate from June (although that number is believed by many to be much higher).

Most chases begin with an attempted traffic stop (89 percent) and end quickly, USA Today reports; 76 percent were over in only five minutes or less in California. But of all the daredevils who try to make an escape, the California Highway patrol calculated 28 percent of high-speed chases ended in crashes; in Minnesota, that number was as high as 40 percent.

The grim long and short of it is, don't try this at home. Jeva Lange

Science!
12:15 p.m. ET

The recent Pluto probe presented a problem for NASA engineers. Spacecraft that are reasonably close to the sun, such as India's Mars Orbiter Mission, use solar panels to supply their electricity. But when you get out to Pluto, the sun is so dim it's barely distinguishable from the rest of the stars.

As Sir Martyn Poliakoff explains, as done before with the Voyager probes, the engineers substituted solar panels for a big hunk of radioactive plutonium. That produces heat, which can be used to generate electricity, and it also keeps the spacecraft warm. The whole thing is rather appropriate given that plutonium was named after the dwarf planet in the first place. Watch the full explanation in the video below. Ryan Cooper

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