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March 19, 2014

Single-serving coffee pods like Keurig's K-Cups are having a moment. Nearly one in five adults makes a single-cup-brewed coffee every day, and the industry is now worth several billion dollars. The industry's popularity shouldn't come as a surprise, since coffee pods are simple to make and easy to clean. But, as Mother Jones reports, the cost of convenience might not outweigh the toll the cups are taking on the environment.

The magazine writes that since each pod is individualized and easy to trash, "you must also exponentially increase the packaging — packaging that ultimately ends up in landfills." And the pieces "aren't that easy to recycle either," it adds.

Mother Jones estimated that the 8.3 billion K-Cups produced by Green Mountain are enough to wrap around the equator 10.5 times — and that's just in 2013. More alarmingly, since only five percent of the cups are recyclable, the rest of the pieces end up in landfills. Read the rest of the story at Mother Jones. Jordan Valinsky

12:18 a.m. ET
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The Golden State Warriors completed their NBA Western Conference Finals comeback on Monday night, beating the Oklahoma City Thunder, 96-88, to earn a shot to face the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals for a second year in a row. Warriors guard Steph Curry notched 36 points, plus eight assists and five rebounds, while Klay Thompson scored 21 points, while the Golden State defense muted the Thunder. Kevin Durant had a pretty good night, scoring 27 points, but his team shot just 38 percent overall. The Warriors are only the 10th NBA team to come back from a 3-1 deficit in a seven-game series. Peter Weber

12:16 a.m. ET
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Animal expert and conservationist Jeff Corwin doesn't want another incident like the killing of Harambe the gorilla to happen again, and is reminding parents that anytime their children are around wild animals, they need to be alert.

"Zoos aren't your babysitter," he told Fox 25. "Take a break from the cell phone, the selfie stick, and the texting. Connect with your children. Be responsible for your children. I don't think it happened in seconds or minutes. I think this took time for this kid, this little boy, to find himself in that situation. Ultimately, it's the gorilla that's paid the price."

On Saturday, a 4-year-old boy entered the Cincinnati Zoo's gorilla enclosure, and Harambe, a 17-year-old, 400 pound silverback gorilla, pulled him. Harambe was shot and killed, with zoo officials saying it had to be done to save the child. The move triggered outrage from the public, with many asking why an adult wasn't paying enough attention to stop the boy from making his way into the enclosure. Corwin told CNN people have "a responsibility. We have so many examples where people don't employ common sense in a national park, trying to take a picture next to a bison, a wild animal. Well, guess who gets sued, the national park, when things go awry." Catherine Garcia

May 30, 2016

As the Golden State Warriors took a solid lead in the third quarter their make-or-break Game 7 of the NBA playoffs against the Oklahoma City Thunder, celebrity foodie Guy Fieri noticed a certain presidential candidate in the crowd:

People at home noticed too, and the reaction was pretty predictable:

Now, to be fair, the Sander campaign did not exactly try to shy away from highlighting Sanders attending the game, or tying him to the Warriors:

And as far as underdog stories go, that dog didn't exactly bark. "Literally zero people said this," statistics-obsessed sports fan Nate Silver tweeted. "Not even an egg avatar said such a thing." Golden State won the game, 96-88, and will go on to play the Cleveland Cavaliers in the NBA Finals. Sanders has a much steeper climb to face Donald Trump in November. Peter Weber

May 30, 2016
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South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff has released a statement saying North Korea tried to launch an unidentified missile early Tuesday morning in the Wonsan area, but likely failed.

The Yonhap news agency reports the missile was a mid-range Musudan, which has a potential range of 2,180 miles, making U.S. military bases in Guam targets. If this report is true, it will be North Korea's fourth unsuccessful test launch of the Musudan since April. South Korea believes North Korea is working on technology to make a missile capable of hitting the U.S. mainland Catherine Garcia

May 30, 2016
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It's no "Lyin' Ted" or "Little Marco," but by dubbing Donald Trump "Mr. Macho," Bernie Sanders is giving him a slight taste of his own medicine.

Trump has famously come up with nicknames for his rivals on both the Republican and Democratic sides, and on Monday, Sanders took a stab at it. While speaking to supporters in Oakland, California, Sanders declared, "Let me not worry about Hillary Clinton right now. Let me worry about Donald Trump — this big, brave, macho guy, my goodness. He said he wanted to debate Bernie Sanders, then he said he didn't, and then he said he did, and then he said he didn't. So I say to Mr. Macho that I am open to a debate anytime, any place here in the state of California, hopefully before the June 7 primary."

Last week, Sanders and Trump went back and forth about debating after the idea came up during the presumptive Republican nominee's appearance on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Sanders said he was game, but on Friday Trump announced it was "inappropriate that I would debate the second place finisher." Catherine Garcia

May 30, 2016

On Monday, more than 100 rescuers in Japan frantically searched for a missing seven-year-old boy, who was left behind in the woods as a form of punishment.

The boy, Yamato Tanooka, has been missing for two days on northern Hokkaido island, in an area known to have bears. A police spokesperson told NBC News his parents first said they became separated from their son while foraging in the woods for plants, but later a family member told police the boy was left as a "form of discipline." The police did not say why Tanooka was being punished or how long he was left alone, but local media reports he was disciplined for throwing rocks at cars and was out of sight for five minutes.

In an appearance on Japanese television, Tanooka's father, whose name is being withheld, said he wanted to "apologize to my son, also for causing trouble for so many people. I'm just filled with the feeling hoping that he comes back safely." Catherine Garcia

May 30, 2016

Donald Trump spent his Memorial Day weekend the same way he spent every other day this year: Fighting on Twitter.

This time, his target was The Weekly Standard's Bill Kristol. The kerfuffle started Sunday, when Kristol tweeted, "Just a heads up over this holiday weekend: There will be an independent candidate — an impressive one, with a strong team and a real chance." Trump wasted no time responding with an insult for Kristol wrapped in a piece of advice for Republicans. "Bill Kristol has been wrong for 2yrs — an embarrassed loser, but if the GOP can't control their own, then they are not a party. Be tough, R's!" He later tweeted, "The Republican Party has to be smart & strong if it wants to win in November. Can't allow lightweights to set up a spoiler Indie candidate!" and "If dummy Bill Kristol actually does get a spoiler to run as an Independent, say good bye to the Supreme Court!"

Kristol is a leader of the #NeverTrump movement, and told CNN on Monday morning he couldn't spill any more details on the alleged independent candidate because there are "still lots of I's to dot and T's to cross." On Monday evening, a clearly pleased with himself Kristol tweeted, "I'm traveling, so hadn't realized I'd so upset @realDonaldTrump. I'm sorry the mere mention of an independent candidate has so unnerved him." He then got in one more jab: "I hope my mention of an independent candidate didn't distract him while paying respects during whichever Memorial Day ceremony he attended." Trump hasn't responded to Kristol's latest tweets, having already moved on to a new opponent: Judge Gonzalo Curiel, "the totally biased" judge in his Trump University case. Catherine Garcia

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