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May 2, 2012

French designer Gisèle Ganne has created a line of divorce rings ($1,348) for the woman ready to convey to the world "a defiant 'I don't.'" Ganne's designs subvert traditional wedding symbols by combining a bird skull with a bride's bouquet and a single gem. The ring can be used to celebrate, advertise, or mourn the end of a union, and the long beak has a decidedly insolent look on the hand. The pieces are available in 18-karat gold or silver, and there's even a knuckle-duster — "for those who are going through a really bad divorce." Source: Daily Mail The Week Staff

July 26, 2017
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At least one person was killed and seven injured Wednesday night when a ride at the Ohio State Fair in Columbus malfunctioned, police said.

Three of the people hurt in the accident are in critical condition. A video posted to YouTube showed "seats of the ride breaking off and bodies flying through the air," NBC News reports. Gov. John Kasich (R) told reporters a full investigation will take place, and he has ordered all rides shut down until additional safety inspections are conducted. "I am terribly saddened by this accident, by the loss of life, and that people were injured enjoying Ohio's fair," he said.

Michael Vartorella, chief inspector for amusement ride safety for Ohio's Department of Agriculture said the ride was looked at "about three or four times over the course of two days" by his team and a third party. Every summer, hundreds of thousands of people attend the fair, which opened on Wednesday. Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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President Trump, still upset with Attorney General Jeff Sessions for recusing himself from the Department of Justice's Russia investigation, has been talking with his close advisers about possibly replacing Sessions through a recess appointment next month if Sessions resigns, four people briefed on the discussions told The Washington Post Wednesday.

Trump has been raging at Sessions in interviews, on Twitter, and at White House events, and some advisers say he wants Sessions to resign rather than be fired, setting up a clean need for a replacement. Trump has been watching several news programs that have discussed a recess appointment, the Post reports, and that's how the seed was planted. Because Trump often changes his mind on things throughout the day, and also floats ideas and hypothetical situations, some advisers told the Post they think he's not really contemplating making a recess appointment, and is only venting about his frustration with Sessions.

Replacing Sessions could be the first step in getting Robert Mueller, the special counsel overseeing the Justice Department's Russia investigation, fired, but several of Trump's closest advisers, including chief strategist Stephen Bannon and Reince Priebus, his chief of staff, have warned Trump that if he ordered Mueller to be let go, it would be a "catastrophe," the Post reports. For his part, Sessions has made no moves to hint that he will be stepping down. Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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The Congressional Budget Office estimates that if the Senate Republicans' "skinny repeal" bill passes, getting rid of ObamaCare's individual and employer mandates, it could result in 16 million Americans losing their health insurance.

It's not entirely clear yet what is in the "skinny bill," as it won't be released until after a voting session that is expected to start Thursday, but a senior Democratic aide told The Hill the CBO said if the bill includes defunding Planned Parenthood and repealing the Community Health Center Fund and Prevention and Public Health Fund, premiums would be about 20 percent higher every year than under the current law.

Senate Democrats released the CBO's estimate on Wednesday evening, after the Senate rejected in a vote of 45-55 a proposal to repeal ObamaCare without immediately replacing it. On Tuesday, the Senate also voted against a modified version of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's plan to replace and replace ObamaCare. It is unclear if McConnell has enough votes for the skinny repeal bill to pass. Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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Foxconn, the giant Taiwanese electronics manufacturer and a major supplier to Apple for iPhones, will open a 20-million square foot plant in southeast Wisconsin, the company announced Wednesday.

Over four years, the company will invest $10 billion to build the plant, which could employ up to 13,000 people and will make LCD display panel screens. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) said the state will award $3 billion in incentives for the project, with the package needing approval from state legislature. He also said it will be the largest economic development in Wisconsin history, Reuters reports.

During a ceremony at the White House with Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou, President Trump took credit for the plant, saying, "If I didn't get elected, he definitely wouldn't be spending $10 billion…this is a great day for America." Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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In an attempt to pressure Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro into canceling this Sunday's election to choose members of an assembly that will rewrite the country's constitution, the United States on Wednesday imposed new sanctions on 13 current and former government officials, military officers, and managers at the state-run oil company.

They are being accused of undermining democracy, corruption, and alleged human rights abuses, The Guardian reports. The targeted officials include Nestor Reverol, who in 2016 was indicted in the U.S. on drug trafficking charges and the next day was promoted to interior ministry for security; army chief Jesus Suarez; and national police director Carlos Perez. Maduro said the Venezuelan government does not "recognize any sanctions," and the vote is still on.

Opposition leaders are boycotting the vote, which they believe will push Venezuela into an authoritarian regime; Maduro said instead, it will usher in peace following months of deadly anti-government protests. Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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Kristin Beck knows what it's like to be in the military — over the course of her 20-year career as a Navy SEAL, she was deployed 13 times to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, and Bosnia, and received the Bronze Star for valor and Purple Heart for wounds suffered in combat.

Beck is a transgender veteran, and wants President Trump to know that his decision to ban transgender people from the U.S. military will have a negative impact on many, and there's no reason for this policy. "Being transgender doesn't affect anyone else," Beck, a member of SEAL Team 6, told Business Insider on Wednesday. "We are liberty's light. If you can't defend that for everyone that's an American citizen, that's not right."

In 2016, the RAND Corporation estimated there are between 1,320 and 6,630 transgender people serving in the military, and Beck, who was born Christopher Beck, said any unit with a good leader wouldn't have any issues with transgender troops. "I can have a Muslim serving right beside Jerry Falwell, and we're not going to have a problem," she said. "It's a leadership issue, not a transgender issue." What really bothers Beck is that Trump claimed his decision was partly based on the cost of services that could be used by transgender service members. "The money is negligible," she told Business Insider. "You're talking about .000001 percent of the military budget. They care more about the airplane or the tank than they care about people. They don't care about people. They don't care about human beings." Catherine Garcia

July 26, 2017
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Sean Spicer tendered his resignation as White House press secretary last Friday, calling his time in the position "an honor and a privilege." While he'll stay in the White House through August, Spicer was spotted in New York City on Wednesday morning, where he was reportedly meeting with several TV networks, possibly in pursuit of a post-government gig.

But the most interesting option by far came from Page Six on Wednesday, when the site reported Spicer might be in talks to take his theatric personality to an actual stage: Reality dancing competition Dancing with the Stars has reached out to the former spokesman about appearing on the show, Page Six claims. "That has legs," an unnamed "TV insider" told Page Six of Spicer possibly cha-cha-ing on the hit ABC show.

When reached by Page Six on Wednesday about the rumor, Spicer said, "I have no comment." ABC told Page Six they "don't comment on casting."

But ... we can hope, right? Kimberly Alters

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