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October 29, 2015
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On Saturday, director Sam Raimi returns to the franchise on which he launched his career with Ash vs. Evil Dead, a Starz TV series that continues the story of the cult classic Evil Dead trilogy. But Raimi is also famous for helming another trio of films: the Spider-Man trilogy, which grossed nearly $2.5 billion before Sony opted to reboot the franchise with Marc Webb's The Amazing Spider-Man, which eventually spawned a sequel. Now, Spider-Man is being rebooted again; the newest iteration of the character will debut in next summer's Captain America: Civil War before going on to star in another solo film of his own.

In a recent interview with The Week, Raimi discussed the character's unusually tumultuous history on the big screen. "I'm not really on top of it," he told me. "I know they made two [Amazing Spider-Man] features, and obviously, I've seen those."

But Raimi also regrets the way his own run with the Spider-Man character ended, and expressed interest in making another Spider-Man someday. "I messed up on the third one," Raimi said. "I think they're so complete now, Marvel. They probably don't need me anymore. But if they needed me? I'd love to. It's great to be wanted." Scott Meslow

10:47 p.m. ET
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On Thursday, the Justice Department sent Congress redacted, unclassified memos written by former FBI Director James Comey detailing private conversations he had with President Trump, in response to a request made earlier this month by the Republican chairmen of the House Judiciary, Intelligence, and Oversight and Government Reform committees.

The Associated Press almost immediately obtained copies of the memos, which don't reveal much that hasn't already been told by Comey in either his congressional testimony last year or his new book, A Higher Loyalty. In a letter to the chairmen, Assistant Attorney General Stephen E. Boyd said that the Justice Department has concluded that releasing the memos will not "adversely impact any ongoing investigation or other confidentiality interests of the executive branch."

In one memo, Comey said Trump confided he had major concerns about former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's judgment, and a few days later, then-White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus asked if Flynn's communications were being monitored under a secret surveillance warrant. In another, Comey wrote that Trump said he was told by Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country has "some of the most beautiful hookers in the world."

Late Thursday, the three chairmen released a joint statement that criticizes Comey and claims his memos show that Trump "wanted allegations of collusion, coordination, and conspiracy between his campaign and Russia fully investigated." Catherine Garcia

9:50 p.m. ET
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A lawyer for Andrew McCabe, the former acting director of the FBI, said on Thursday federal prosecutors have been sent a criminal referral for his client from the Department of Justice's inspector general.

The inspector general released a report saying that in 2016, McCabe misled investigators who were trying to figure out who disclosed information to a Wall Street Journal reporter about an investigation into the Clinton Foundation; McCabe has called the accusations "egregious inaccuracies." McCabe was fired last month by Attorney General Jeff Sessions after the allegations came out against him, just before he was eligible for retirement benefits.

McCabe's lawyer, Michael R. Bromwich, told The New York Times he's "confident that, unless there is inappropriate pressure from high levels of the administration, the U.S. attorney's office will conclude that it should decline to prosecute." McCabe asserts that the report and his firing are meant to discredit him as a witness in Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into whether President Trump obstructed justice while trying to interfere with the probe. Catherine Garcia

8:42 p.m. ET
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Former professional cyclist Lance Armstrong has agreed to pay the federal government $5 million to settle fraud allegations, which could have ended up costing him $100 million.

The U.S. Postal Service once sponsored Armstrong's team, and argued that he defrauded taxpayers by accepting money while using performance-enhancing drugs, NPR reports. In a statement, the disgraced cyclist said he was ready to "move forward with my life." Chad Reader, acting attorney general for the Justice Department's civil division, said the settlement "demonstrates that those who cheat the government will be held accountable."

Armstrong admitted in 2013 that he did use performance-enhancing drugs, and he was stripped of his Tour de France wins and banned from competition for life. His former teammate, Floyd Landis, sued Armstrong in 2010 under the False Claims Act, and federal prosecutors joined his suit in 2013 on behalf of the USPS. As part of the settlement, Landis, who also admitted to doping, will receive about $1.1 million. Catherine Garcia

7:48 p.m. ET
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The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency could announce as early as Friday that Wells Fargo is being fined $1 billion for, among other things, charging customers for car insurance they didn't need, a person familiar with the penalty told CNN Money.

Last year, the company apologized for forcing as many as 570,000 customers into purchasing unnecessary car insurance, and said after conducting an internal review, it was discovered that 20,000 or so of those clients may have defaulted on their car loans and had their vehicles repossessed because of the insurance cost. Wells Fargo also announced in October that some mortgage borrowers were charged after missing a deadline to lock in interest rates, even though the delay was caused by the company and not customers. Catherine Garcia

6:59 p.m. ET
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Queen Elizabeth II made it official on Thursday, publicly announcing for the first time that it is her "sincere wish" that "one day," Prince Charles lead the Commonwealth.

Being head of the Commonwealth is not hereditary, and upon the Queen's death, the role would not automatically go to the Prince of Wales. The Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting is underway in London, and Maltese Prime Minister Joseph Muscat said he believes it's likely the leaders will confirm Prince Charles on Friday. They will also discuss ocean conservation, trade, and cyber security during the two-day summit.

The Queen told the 53 leaders gathered at Buckingham Palace on Thursday it was a "pleasure" to welcome them to her home, and it is her "sincere wish that the Commonwealth will continue to offer stability and continuity for future generations, and will decide that one day the Prince of Wales should carry on the important work started by my father in 1949." Catherine Garcia

5:23 p.m. ET
AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster

Rudy Giuliani, the former federal prosecutor and mayor of New York City, has joined President Trump's legal team. He will specifically join the corps of lawyers representing Trump in the ongoing investigation into Russian election meddling being led by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Giuliani is a high-profile new addition to a team that has "struggled to recruit new members to its ranks," The Washington Post wrote. Giuliani confirmed his new position in a Thursday interview with the Post, saying, "I'm doing it because I hope we can negotiate an end to this for the good of the country, and because I have high regard for the president and for Bob Mueller."

Trump is currently represented in Mueller's investigation by attorneys Jay Sekulow and Ty Cobb. Giuliani told the Post that he spoke to both men earlier this week about signing on. John Dowd, Trump's personal attorney in the Russia probe, stepped down last month, reportedly after concluding that Trump was ignoring his counsel.

Trump considered appointing Giuliani to be attorney general before ultimately selecting Jeff Sessions. In a statement released by his attorneys, Trump celebrated the hire, saying: "Rudy is great. He has been my friend for a long time and wants to get this matter quickly resolved for the good of the country."

Read more about Giuliani's new gig at The Washington Post. Kimberly Alters

4:57 p.m. ET
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Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told President Trump he isn't a target in the Russia probe, two sources "familiar with the matter" told Bloomberg.

Rosenstein's assurance reportedly came last Thursday, after Trump spent weeks tweeting his displeasure with Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian election meddling. Rosenstein appointed Mueller to lead the investigation in March 2017.

Rosenstein's disclosure reportedly led the president to slow down his attacks on Mueller's probe. Trump told one source that he doesn't even want to fire either Rosenstein or Mueller now, Bloomberg reports, because a dismissal could stretch out the investigation.

But Rosenstein may have told Trump something that's not quite true, Bloomberg reports. Just because Mueller isn't going after Trump now doesn't mean he won't eventually, a U.S. official "with knowledge of the unfolding investigation" noted. Kathryn Krawczyk

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