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January 12, 2016
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CBS' Nancy Drew is going to look a little different than the blond-haired, blue-eyed character described in the books. According to CBS Entertainment president Glenn Geller, the forthcoming Nancy Drew television series will be casting a woman of color in the lead role.

"[She will] not [be] Caucasian. I'd be open to any ethnicity," Geller told The Hollywood Reporter on Tuesday. "We have a lot of new series in development, both series targeted to have full African-American or Latino casts but also many leads that are being developed [as diverse]. We're not casting color blind, we're casting color conscious."

The new Nancy Drew series will break from the books in other ways, as well: It will take place in modern times, with Nancy in her 30s and working for the NYPD.

The Nancy Drew series was originally created by Edward Stratemeyer in the 1930s, and published under the name Carolyn Keene. While there have been numerous adaptations of the series over the years, the most recent Nancy Drew was played by Emma Roberts in a 2007 release. Jeva Lange

10:39 p.m. ET

Seth Meyers is trying to get to the bottom of the latest Washington mystery: Is Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.) — the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, a former member of President Trump's transition team, and someone who "looks like every guy you don't remember meeting" — investigating Trump or working with him? 


On Tuesday's Late Night, Meyers went over Nunes' past week, which involved him claiming to have seen evidence that communications involving people close to Trump were accidentally picked up by surveillance, telling Trump about it at the White House, and not sharing the information with his fellow committee members. Since his first solo press conference, additional bizarre details have come to light, like Nunes receiving a mysterious message while in a car with a staffer, then bailing for an Uber and vanishing into the night, leading Meyers to declare, "This whole thing is starting to turn into an episode of Dateline."

The public doesn't know what evidence was so explosive Nunes had to ditch one moving vehicle for another, but CNN reported that a Republican briefed on what Nunes has seen said it's "almost like the kind of trivia you would pick up" during a casual conversation, like where Trump was having dinner. "Nunes has been running around D.C. like he's James Bond just to find out where Trump had dinner? That surveillance feed must have been pretty boring," Meyers said, before slipping into his Trump-at-a-KFC impersonation: "'I'll have the 12-piece bucket, extra crispy, in fact it should be the same color as my skin. Thank you. I hope this isn't being tapped.'" Watch the video below, but be warned: It will probably leave you with more questions than answers. Catherine Garcia

9:01 p.m. ET
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While driving toward a tornado Tuesday afternoon near Lubbock, Texas, three storm chasers were killed when their SUV ran a stop sign and hit another car.

Texas Department of Public Safety Sgt. John Gonzalez told CBS Dallas the storm had nothing to do with the accident; the vehicle collided with a Jeep, and all three storm chasers were pronounced dead at the scene. "We would encourage anyone driving down these remote roads to slow down and pay attention to traffic signs, especially in inclement weather," Gonzalez said. "It can become dangerous for all involved." Catherine Garcia

8:13 p.m. ET
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The House voted Tuesday 215-205 on a measure that repeals new Federal Communications Commission regulations that would have required high-speed internet service providers get customer approval before sharing and using such personal information as their browsing history and app usage.

The rules were approved by the FCC in October, on a 3-2 party line vote. The broadband companies and Republicans argued that websites and social networks that collect information on customers and use it to place targeted ads are not subject to strict rules, while supporters — including Democrats and privacy advocates — said they are worried about what data the ISPs will collect without permission. The Senate voted to repeal the measure last week, and President Trump is expected to sign it. Catherine Garcia

6:59 p.m. ET
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On Tuesday, Wells Fargo announced it has reached a $110 million settlement covering dozens of lawsuits across the United States, in connection with employees setting up more than 2 million unauthorized accounts for customers.

The deal must be approved by a federal judge, and it comes six months after the company agreed to pay $185 million in fines and penalties as part of a settlement with the Los Angeles city attorney's office and federal regulators. Wells Fargo has ended its system of having employees hit sales targets, which regulators said caused workers to create the fake deposit and credit card accounts in order to make more money. Catherine Garcia

5:34 p.m. ET
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Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez has requested all DNC staffers submit their letters of resignation by April 15, NBC News reported Tuesday, citing sources familiar with the organization. While turnover isn't unusual when a new chair takes over, Perez's complete house-cleaning signals how drastically he plans to reorganize the Democratic Party.

Perez was elected in late February to replace interim chair Donna Brazile, who filled the position after former chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (Fla.) stepped down just before the Democratic National Convention last summer. NBC News reported the "top-to-bottom review process" is intended to discern "how the party should be structured in the future," after it was pummeled in the 2016 elections.

One aide told NBC News to expect the announcements in "coming weeks." The DNC declined to comment. Becca Stanek

4:52 p.m. ET
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Actor Alec Baldwin has hosted Saturday Night Live a record 17 times, but if you ask him, he doesn't think he's funny. In an excerpt adapted from his upcoming book, Nevertheless: A Memoir, published Tuesday in Vanity Fair, Baldwin said his first stint on Saturday Night Live in 1990 made him realize what it really takes to be funny:

Whenever anyone told me I was funny, I was reminded of when people in high school tell someone that he can hit a fastball or shoot a basketball well. Then he gets to college and everyone is big and fast and strong. After that, if he turns professional, everyone around him seems inhuman. They're the biggest, fastest, and strongest. That's what Saturday Night Live was like for me. The worst idea the writers there came up with was funnier than the best thing I could think up. My definition of funny changed while working with them. If people think I can say a line in a way that gets a laugh, I'll take it. But I'm not funny. The SNL writers are funny. Tina Fey is funny. Conan O'Brien is funny. You're only funny if you can write the material. What I do is acting. [Alec Baldwin, via Vanity Fair]

Baldwin admitted Fey's funniness swept him off his feet the first time he laid eyes on her. "When I first met Tina Fey — beautiful and brunette, smart and funny, by turns smug and diffident and completely uninterested in me or anything I had to say — I had the same reaction that I'm sure many men and women have: I fell in love," Baldwin wrote.

Read the rest at Vanity Fair. Becca Stanek

3:23 p.m. ET
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MSNBC just celebrated the biggest quarter in its 21-year history, and leading the charge is Rachel Maddow, whose Rachel Maddow Show ranked as the top cable news program among adults between the ages of 25 and 54 in March. As TVNewser observes, "Maddow, the dominant voice for progressives on cable news, may be benefiting the most from the Trump administration's first 100 days."

Fox News' Tucker Carlson Tonight is the usual winner in Maddow's time slot. MSNBC has never before earned a 9 p.m. win over Fox News in the coveted 25-54 demographic. Maddow's show also celebrated its biggest audience ever in March when Maddow teased a scoop about President Trump's tax returns.

Other shows on MSNBC are also doing well, including Morning Joe, which celebrated its most-watched quarter ever and ranked second in total viewers among all cable news programs in the time period. MSNBC is now the fastest growing cable news network, TVNewser reports. Jeva Lange

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