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February 20, 2016
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If there are any ties at a Nevada precinct Saturday during the Democratic caucuses, officials plan on breaking open a deck of cards to settle it. The Hill reports that instead of the much-discussed coin tosses that broke ties in the Iowa caucuses, "a game of chance will decide" whether Hillary Clinton or Sen. Bernie Sanders wins the precinct delegates in the event of a tie.

First, each deck must be shuffled seven times. A supporter from each group will draw a card and the highest one wins a delegate.

If each group chooses the same number or face card, the card suit will then settle who wins the tie. The suits are ranked from highest to lowest: spades, hearts, diamonds, and clubs. [The Hill]

This card-drawing method was used previously in Nevada in 2008. Then-Sen. Barack Obama reportedly won a delegate over Clinton because his supporter drew a higher card.

Update 4:34 p.m. ET: The tie-breaking card draw came into play in Precinct 10 Saturday, handing a win to Hillary Clinton after a Clinton supporter drew an ace, beating a Sanders' supporter's six. Becca Stanek

11:22 p.m. ET
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Not wanting to tick off The Boss, a Bruce Springsteen cover band says it won't play the Garden State Presidential Inaugural Gala on Thursday.

Since 1980, the B-Street Band has played 200 shows a year, and in 2013, after performing during President Obama's inauguration, signed a contract to play four years later. They obviously didn't know who would be president at the time, but once Donald Trump was elected, "the complexity of the situation became real immense and intense," Will Forte, keyboardist, manager, agent, and publicist for the band, told Rolling Stone. The group received "thousands of emails from both sides" when it was announced they would be playing the gala, Forte said, and they had to "get out of the storm."

Springsteen is a vocal critic of Trump, and after Forte started seeing headlines declaring that the band was personally hired by the president-elect, he knew it was time to call it quits. "We felt that we had to make it known that we didn't want to seem disrespectful, in any way, shape, or form, to Bruce and his music and his band," he told Rolling Stone. "I don't want to upset them. We owe everything to him, and our gratitude and respect to the band is imperative above all else." Forte said he doesn't think there will "ever be a cover band of our size in the history of music that has gotten the attention of something this big," and "whatever the consequences are for breaking a contract, I'm willing to take because this is much more important." Catherine Garcia

9:56 p.m. ET
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For someone so intimately familiar with Twitter, Donald Trump made a major faux pas on Monday night when instead of tagging his daughter, @IvankaTrump, in a post, he tagged @Ivanka, an English woman whose mentions are about to get very interesting.

In his first message of the night, Trump, who hates CNN so much he watches it every day and knows what programs the network is airing, tweeted that CNN was doing a "special report on my daughter, Ivanka. Considering it is CNN, can't imagine it will be great!" He followed it with a modified retweet from a Twitter user named @drgoodspine, who had tagged Trump and his non-daughter, @Ivanka.

In his original tweet, @drgoodspine said "@Ivanka Trump is Great a woman with real character and class." Trump changed one of two errors in this message — the king of the caps lock made the "G" in "great" lowercase — but kept @Ivanka as is. As Trump himself once said: "I think that computers have complicated lives very greatly. The whole age of the computer has made it where nobody knows exactly what's going on." Catherine Garcia

9:10 p.m. ET
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Eugene "Gene" Cernan, the astronaut famous for being the last person to walk on the moon, died Monday in Houston. He was 82.

His family said in a statement he had ongoing health issues, but the exact cause of death is unknown. In 1963, Cernan, a Navy fighter pilot, was selected by NASA as one of 14 people to participate in the third astronaut class. He piloted the Gemini 9 mission, and was the second American to walk in space — he later called it the "spacewalk from hell," USA Today reports, because his equipment didn't work properly, he became overheated, and he almost didn't make it back to the spacecraft.

Cernan was one of two astronauts to fly to the moon twice, and as he left for the last time on Dec. 14, 1972, he declared: "American's challenge of today has forged man's destiny of tomorrow. As we leave the moon and Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came and, God willing, we shall return with peace and hope for all mankind." He later said he didn't want to climb the ladder up to the spacecraft, because he "wanted to stay a while." He was hopeful that astronauts would return to the moon, and in a statement, his family said, "Even at the age of 82, Gene was passionate about sharing his desire to see the continued human exploration of space and encouraged our nation's leaders and young people to not let him remain the last man to walk on the moon."

After retiring from the space program in 1976, Cernan served as an executive vice president of Coral Petroleum Inc., and went on to start the Cernan Corp. Survivors include his wife, Jan Nanna Cernan; daughter Tracy Cernan Woolie; stepdaughters Kelly Nanna Taff and Danielle Nanna Ellis; and nine grandchildren. Catherine Garcia

8:05 p.m. ET
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On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, two of the late civil rights leader's children participated in two very different events.

Speaking at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, where her father once preached, Bernice King, his youngest daughter, told the crowd not to be "afraid of who sits in the White House," adding, "God can triumph over [Donald] Trump." She received a standing ovation and thunderous applause. At the same time, Trump, who received 8 percent of the black vote, was in New York meeting with King's brother, Martin Luther King III. As he left Trump Tower, King said he believes the U.S. voting system is broken, and he spoke with Trump about how to improve it.

On Saturday, Trump was blasted for attacking 1960s civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.) on Twitter. In an interview with NBC News, Lewis had said that because of evidence of Russia meddling in the election to help Trump win, "I don't see this president-elect as a legitimate president." Trump accused Lewis, whose skull was fractured when he was beaten by a state trooper on a day that became known as Bloody Sunday, of being "all talk, talk, talk ‚ no action or results." King did not directly comment on whether he was offended by what Trump said about a man who worked side by side with his father, saying: "First of all, I think that in the heat of emotion a lot of things get said on both sides. I think at some point, I bridge-build. The goal is to bring America together." Catherine Garcia

6:41 p.m. ET
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Several Turkish media outlets are reporting that a man suspected of killing 39 people during a New Year's Day attack at a nightclub in Istanbul has been caught.

The NTV television channel reports the suspect was tracked down to a house in Istanbul's Esenyurt district owned by a friend from Kyrgyzstan and captured late Monday during a special operations police raid. The Hurriyet newspaper has identified the suspect as Abdulkadir Masharipov, an Uzbekistan national, and NTV says he resisted arrest, but was detained along with his friend and three others. ISIS claimed responsibility in the aftermath of the massacre at Reina nightclub, saying it was in retaliation for Turkish military operations in Syria. Catherine Garcia

3:02 p.m. ET
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Secretary of State John Kerry on Monday said President-elect Donald Trump's tendency to insert himself into the political matters of foreign countries is "inappropriate." Kerry spoke specifically about Trump's recent remarks criticizing German Chancellor Angela Merkel's decision to accept a wave of refugees, which Trump called "one very catastrophic mistake" in an interview with German publication Bild.

"I thought frankly it was inappropriate for a president-elect of the United States to be stepping into the politics of other countries in a quite direct manner," Kerry told CNN's Christiane Amanpour. Kerry, for his part, called Merkel's refugee policy "extremely courageous." Jessica Hullinger

2:03 p.m. ET
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With just four days left until Donald Trump takes the oath of office, the president-elect's favorable rating remains stubbornly — and historically — low. A new Gallup poll finds Trump with a 40 percent favorable rating, or roughly half of Obama's 78 percent rating leading up to his 2009 inauguration. Trump holds the distinction of being the only incoming president, of the most recent four, whose unfavorable score is higher than his favorable score. Fifty-five percent of respondents have an unfavorable view of Trump, compared to just 18 percent of Obama in 2009.

But it's not all bad. Gallup reports that Trump's favorable rating is at least slightly higher than it was during the presidential campaign, when it stayed put at 38 percent. And 82 percent of Republicans say they are in Trump's corner. But that's notably lower than George W. Bush's soaring 97 percent favorable rating among Republicans back in 2001.

"The president-elect's general unpopularity is an unprecedented hurdle, whose impact on his ability to govern remains to be seen," Gallup reports. "As he takes office, Trump also faces much greater political polarization than his successors, even though all recent presidents have faced fairly stiff opposition from non-supporters once in office."

This new poll was conducted Jan. 4-8 among 1,032 adults. It has a margin of error of 4 percentage points. Jessica Hullinger

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