May 16, 2017

Congressional Republicans have taken some criticism for expressing their "concerns" about President Trump's behavior, as a series of scandals involving Russia and the FBI investigation into his campaign unfold, and leaving it at that. But Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) played the Nixon card on Tuesday night, while accepting a Freedom Award from the International Republican Institute. "I think we've seen this movie before; I think it appears at a point where it's of Watergate size and scale," McCain told veteran TV journalist Bob Scheiffer, according to reporters at the dinner. "The shoes continue to drop, and every couple days there's a new aspect."

McCain, who's had a strained relationship with Trump, said his advice to Trump would be "the same thing that you advised Richard Nixon, which he didn't do ... get it all out," The Daily Beast's Tim Mak reports. "It's not going to be over until every aspect of it is thoroughly examined and the American people make a judgment," McCain added. "And the longer you delay, the longer it's going to last."

McCain also criticized Trump for hosting Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in the Oval Office last week — when Trump apparently revealed highly classified intelligence to Lavrov and Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. "I've known this guy Lavrov for 30 years, he's an old KGB apparatchik stooge, and Putin is a murderer and a thug," McCain said. "And to have Lavrov in the Oval Office and be friendly with the guy whose boss ... sent aircraft with precision weapons to attack hospitals in Aleppo, I just think it's unacceptable."

Talk of impeachment and "obstruction of justice" is reportedly starting to percolate on Capitol Hill, after The New York Times reported Tuesday afternoon that fired FBI Director James Comey kept contemporaneous notes indicating that Trump asked him to drop the FBI's investigation of just-fired National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. That has set off yet another frenzy of media speculation, but you can watch a calm analysis of what that might mean from The Associated Press' Catherine Lucey below. Peter Weber

5:41 p.m. ET

A mummified skeleton found in Chile nearly two decades ago inspired many a conspiracy theorist to declare that alien life had made its way to Earth. But a buzzkilling new study published Thursday found that the bones simply belonged to a human with a series of bone mutations.

The 6-inch skeleton — dubbed Ata by researchers and alien aficionados — displays an unusual series of DNA mutations, reports The New York Times. The combination of mutations may have caused a hereditary disorder that has never been seen before in humans, the Times explains.

That explains the utterly bizarre appearance of Ata, whose tiny frame has just ten ribs, rather than 12; a pointy, elongated skull; and large, alien-like eye sockets. Researchers don't know exactly when Ata lived, but some scientists now believe that she was a miscarried or aborted female fetus, preserved by dry conditions in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile.

Because the mutations are brand new discoveries, researchers who sequenced the skeleton's genome are hesitant to declare a definitive explanation for Ata's deformities — unlike, say, a 2013 documentary about UFOs that featured the skeleton as evidence of extraterrestrial life. At least some of the mystery of Ata remains, for now.

Read more about Ata at The New York Times. Summer Meza

4:44 p.m. ET

It's only been a week since Toys 'R' Us announced it would close all of its stores, but heartbreak has hit the shelves again. Toys 'R' Us founder Charles Lazarus died Thursday, the company confirmed. He was 94.

Former CEO Michael Goldstein took over the company from Lazarus in 1994, but told CNN Money that Lazarus' legacy as "the father of the toy business" lived on.

Lazarus got the idea for Toys 'R' Us as he returned from World War II, per USA Today. His friends were ready to start families, and he soon envisioned superstores stocked to the ceiling with toys. The company's name was a pun on Lazarus' last name, while the iconic backwards "R" mimicked a child's handwriting.

Toys 'R' Us thrived through the baby boom and hit its peak in the 1980s, per CNN Money, but the arrivals of Walmart and online behemoth Amazon eventually took their toll. Liquidation sales were scheduled to begin Thursday. Kathryn Krawczyk

3:47 p.m. ET

CNN President Jeff Zucker isn't quite sure Fox News is an accurate name for his competitor's cable channel.

"The idea that it's a news channel, I think, is really not the case at all," Zucker said at an industry conference Thursday, per The Hollywood Reporter.

Those were reportedly some of Zucker's tamer words, as he went on to label Fox News a "complete propaganda machine" that does an "incredible disservice to this country." He even drew comparisons to Russia, calling Fox News "state-run TV."

Tucker didn't limit his comments to President Trump's network of choice; he spoke on the president too. Trump, Zucker said, "doesn't even understand the danger he's causing to journalists" by sowing "anti-media sentiment" — though late last year, he credited Trump with making "journalism great again."

But that's what makes today the "heyday of cable news," Zucker said — and everyone from CNN to Fox News is benefiting from it. Kathryn Krawczyk

3:29 p.m. ET

President Trump offered his younger self some advice while speaking at a millennial-focused panel Thursday.

Asked for wisdom he'd pass on to his 25-year-old self, Trump offered a quip: "Don't run for president," he smirked.

Later in the discussion, Trump lamented how much negative press he received once he announced his bid for the White House. Prior to his involvement in politics, he "got the greatest publicity," he said. Despite all the critical coverage, Trump claimed, people "get it," because they now know about "fake news."

"There is a lot of fake news out there, and nobody had any idea," he continued. "I'm actually proud of the fact that I exposed it to a large extent. We exposed it. It's an achievement."

Trump was interviewed by the leader of Turning Point USA, a network of conservative college students. The president also discussed the opioid crisis, the need for more vocational schools, and young conservatives who are too afraid to vocally support his administration. Watch the clip below, via Bloomberg. Summer Meza

2:39 p.m. ET

Instagram's universally despised algorithm has been so widely criticized that the company announced Thursday that it is going to make significant changes to appease users. In a statement, Instagram said it will at last "ensure that newer posts are more likely to appear first in feed," which will hopefully mean you will no longer miss, well, everything. As Gizmodo puts it: "Instagram apparently no longer wants you to see Christmas Day photos on New Year’s Eve."

While that might seem like common sense, Instagram first started experimenting with a non-chronological feed in the spring of 2016. By 2018, the app was apparently rewarding posts with higher engagement, users who interacted with followers, and making tweaks based on how long other users spent viewing your post or engaging in the content, Later reports.

Other changes are coming too, like a "new posts" button "that lets you choose when you want to refresh, rather than it happening automatically." Finally! Jeva Lange

2:29 p.m. ET

President Trump says he would still talk to Special Counsel Robert Mueller even without his lead lawyer, The Associated Press reported Thursday.

Another day of legal chaos started Thursday morning as John Dowd, Trump's lead lawyer in Mueller's Russia probe, resigned. A little more than an hour later, Trump was asked if he'd still be willing to testify in Mueller's investigation.

"Yes. I would like to," he replied.

It's pretty much the opposite of what Dowd called for Saturday: an end to the investigation into connections between Trump's campaign and Russia, The New York Times reported. Dowd is said to have resigned because Trump wasn't listening to his advice; Dowd reportedly did not want the president to sit for an interview with Mueller's team, while Trump apparently feels he should. Kathryn Krawczyk

1:33 p.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The House passed the $1.3 trillion spending bill Thursday, approving the massive package to fund the federal government through September.

The 2,232-page bill was released late Wednesday after congressional negotiators finalized its terms. The proposal increases spending on the military and border protection and provides $1.6 billion for President Trump's proposed border wall — a fraction of the $25 billion the president sought. It does not address the DACA immigration program or defunding sanctuary cities, two hotly-contested provisions, though it does include provisions to increase school safety.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle applauded victories achieved in the omnibus bill while some criticized the ways it fell short. Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) called it "the worst bill I have seen." The Senate will vote on the bill next, as lawmakers move quickly to meet a Friday night deadline to prevent a government shutdown.

Read more at The New York Times. Summer Meza

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