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September 21, 2017
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A new study in the wake of the Flint, Michigan, water contamination crisis uncovered unsettling trends in fertility rates and fetal deaths during the time period the city was grappling with high levels of lead in its water supply. The working paper by West Virginia University's Daniel Grossman and University of Kansas' David Slusky concluded that "between 198 and 276 more children would have been born had Flint not enacted the switch in water."

Fetal deaths, when pregnancies last longer than 20 weeks but don't result in a live birth, rose 58 percent from April 2014 to 2016. Fertility rates dropped by 12 percent during that time period. "Either Flint residents were unable to conceive children, or women were having more miscarriages during this time," Slusky said.

The timing of these shifts is notable, as it was in 2014 when Flint's water was contaminated with dangerous levels of lead after the local government, under a state-appointed emergency manager, changed the city's water sources. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention say that lead "can damage a developing baby's nervous system, causing miscarriages and stillbirths, as well as infertility in both men and women," USA Today reported.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, however, concluded in July 2015 that there was no "evidence that indicates the water switch" affected fetal death rates. Becca Stanek

10:04 a.m. ET
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"To the people of the United States, please help us," begins an open letter to America handwritten in Spanish and signed Sunday by 54 migrant parents who remain separated from their children and detained in Texas.

"We are desperate parents," the note continues. "We were not prepared for the nightmare that we faced here. The United States government kidnapped our children with tricks and didn't give us the opportunity to say goodbye."

The parents were separated from their children more than a month ago, and since then contact, even by phone, has been extremely limited. "Each day is more painful that the last. Many of us have only had the chance to speak to our children once (this is very difficult because the social workers never answer)," the letter explains. "The children cry; they don't recognize our voices; and they feel abandoned and unloved. This makes us feel like we are dead."

The letter's signatories are seeking asylum in the United States while they wait to be reunited with their children. They are held at the Port Isabel Service Detention Center in Los Fresnos, Texas. As of Friday, about 2,500 children remain separated from their families. Bonnie Kristian

9:50 a.m. ET
MIKHAIL KLIMENTYEV/AFP/Getty Images

From redecorating the White House to proposing an Air Force One upgrade, President Trump is a man consumed with his image. But Russian President Vladimir Putin may be giving him a run for his money.

Putin rolled up to his Finland meeting with Trump almost an hour late Monday, The Washington Post reports. It's typical of the Russian leader, data from The Independent shows — and some say it's an attempt at showing dominance.

After ripping off his jacket on the tarmac, Putin ducked into a 22-foot-long, Russian-made vehicle that drew comparisons to Trump's "Beast" of a Cadillac, the Post noted. The massive vehicle is Russia's first luxury car produced in years, per state media.

Putin has elevated his brand during his presidency, graduating from oversized suits to shirtless horseback rides, the Post points out. He's carefully crafted a tough-guy image to counter his country's shaky one. That image — apparently built by once showing up four hours late to meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel — has even earned him comparisons to Trump.

Putin also arrived 40 minutes late to meet former President Barack Obama, making his tardiness bipartisan. Kathryn Krawczyk

9:46 a.m. ET

President Trump's tweets have astounded, amazed, and enraged many people on many topics over the years, but usually his closest followers will give him a pass on his particularly outrageous posts.

His Monday morning tweet about strained U.S.-Russia relations, however, appears to be an exception. Brian Kilmeade, host of Trump's favorite news show Fox & Friends, had a hard time getting his head around the fact that Trump chose to place the blame on "U.S. foolishness and stupidity," and he asked former House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) to offer some clarity.

"I like the president's tweets, I understand what he’s trying to do with the EU and NATO," said Kilmeade, who ordinarily vocally supports most of Trump's statements and policies. “But what I don't understand is this tweet. It's really not our foolishness and stupidity. They might not like the things we're doing — but would you really say foolishness and stupidity is a correct characterization?"

Gingrich vaguely agreed with Trump's assessment, saying he wouldn't "try to rewrite the president's tweets." He cited "weakness" from previous administrations, but said that Trump knows how to "deal with" Putin. Watch the moment below, via Fox News. Summer Meza

9:04 a.m. ET
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As President Trump meets with an actual, intelligence community-certified geopolitical foe Monday, his combative rhetoric may be costing America one of its closest allies.

In an interview with CBS News that aired Sunday, anchor Jeff Glor asked Trump to name the U.S.'s "biggest foe globally right now." In response, Trump named Russia, China, and the European Union, for "what they do to us in trade." "You wouldn't think of the European Union [as a foe]," he said, "but they're a foe."

The comments prompted pushback from Germany on Monday, as Trump was meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin behind closed doors. "We can no longer completely rely on the White House," German Foreign Minister Heiko Mass told reporters Monday, per Reuters. "To maintain our partnership with the U.S.A. we must readjust it." German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been considered the de facto head of the EU since becoming chancellor in 2005.

Trump has threatened steep tariffs on auto imports from the EU, and his "foe" comments additionally follow the highly contentious NATO summit last week, where he threatened to withdraw American support from the alliance and pressed treaty members to rapidly and substantially increase their defense spending. Merkel called the summit "very intense" at the time, though she did call for Germany to up its defense contributions to the alliance. Kimberly Alters

8:47 a.m. ET

There was big news on Russia's 2016 election meddling late last week, when Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Friday indicted 12 Russian intelligence agents in connection with hacking Democratic emails. But that's apparently not on the agenda for President Trump's meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Finland today.

The two leaders will be having "discussions on everything from trade to military to missiles to nuclear to China," Trump spelled out in a pre-summit press conference alongside Putin. The talks will help the two countries form an "extraordinary relationship," Trump promised.

But that "everything" doesn't necessarily seem to include the Justice Department's Friday indictment of Russian agents who allegedly hacked the emails of the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton. While Trump said before Friday's indictment that he'd "absolutely" ask Putin about Russia's election meddling, Trump has since barely acknowledged the new charges, which mark a big step in laying out the details of Russian interference in the 2016 election. His Twitter feed simply blamed America for worsening U.S.-Russia relations, and faulted former President Barack Obama for the hacking. Kathryn Krawczyk

7:41 a.m. ET

President Trump blames America for souring relations between the U.S. and Russia. As it turns out, so does Russia.

In an early-morning tweet before his Monday meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Trump said that the U.S.-Russia relationship has "NEVER been worse thanks to many years of U.S. foolishness" and the more recent "Witch Hunt," a reference to Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election.

Russia's Foreign Affairs Ministry had a simple response to Trump's finger-pointing:

The meeting comes just days after the U.S. Justice Department indicted 12 Russian intelligence agents allegedly connected to email hacking in the 2016 election. The White House's response to the charges avoided condemning Russia, and Trump hasn't said whether he'll bring the charges up in his meeting with Putin. Some top Democrats urged him to cancel the summit altogether. Kathryn Krawczyk

2:35 a.m. ET
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Instead of using their discretion, two police officers in Roswell, Georgia, chose in April to let a coin-flip app decide whether to arrest a woman stopped for speeding.

WXIA-TV obtained body camera video of the incident, and Officer Courtney Brown can be heard asking Sarah Webb if she knows how fast she was going. Webb said she was sorry for speeding, but was late for work. Brown asks Webb to hand over the keys, and then walks to her patrol car, where she asks other officers if she should arrest Webb or give her a ticket.

Brown is heard saying she did not record Webb's speed, and then says, "Hold on," proceeding to open a coin-flip app on her phone, CBS News reports. Officer Kristee Wilson pipes up, and says if it's heads Webb should be arrested, and if it's tails, she should be free to go. The app gives Brown tails, but Wilson suggests she be arrested anyway, and Webb is detained, charged with going too fast for conditions and reckless driving. Those charges were ultimately dropped.

Police Chief Rusty Grant told CBS News on Friday he was "appalled" that any officers would "trivialize the decision making process of something as important as the arrest of a person," and said as soon as he heard about the incident, an investigation was launched and the two officers were placed on administrative leave. Webb, who said she didn't know about the use of the app until she was contacted weeks later by WXIA, called the incident "degrading." Catherine Garcia

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