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June 7, 2018

"Here's a sentence I don't often say: Donald Trump did something good," Stephen Colbert said on Wednesday's Late Show. Commuting the life sentence of great-grandmother and nonviolent drug offender Alice Johnson was the right thing to do, he said, "but maybe he did the right thing for the wrong reason. Because there was no legal process or review, as there normally is. Trump just commuted her sentence because of a meeting with Kim Kardashian. So executive clemency is now just a reality TV show — stay tuned for The Pardoner."

In fact, people are now going on Fox News to beg Trump to pardon their husbands, Colbert noted. "Going on Fox News is one of the best ways to make sure Trump gets your message — other than writing it on his steak in ketchup." But Trump has pardons on his mind more than ever these days, he added. "Insiders say Trump's become fixated on his ability to issue pardons because it's the one area where he has almost unchecked power. And I'm actually okay with that. It's like letting a toddler play with an electric razor: It's gonna look crazy when it's over but he's having a good time."

Colbert turned to Trump's new tariffs on Canada, Mexico, and the EU, "also known as the legion of people who still like us," he joked — or did like us, anyway. Canada is upset because, among other reasons, Trump first had to classify Canada as a national security threat, a proposition he reportedly backed up by asking Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau if it wasn't true that Canada burned down the White House. (It isn't.). "Trump was probably referring to the War of 1812 when, in actuality, British troops burned down the White House," Colbert said. "Still, that is shockingly almost accurate. Since when does Donald Trump know anything about American history?" Watch below. Peter Weber

12:10a.m.

The Boston Red Sox defeated the Houston Astros 4-1 on Thursday, capturing the American League pennant.

They are now heading to the World Series, where they will play the winner of the National League Championship Series — either the Los Angeles Dodgers or the Milwaukee Brewers. Red Sox pitcher David Price had a playoff career-high of nine strikeouts and six shutout innings. The Red Sox were able to eliminate the Astros, last year's World Series champions, in five games. The World Series starts Tuesday. Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

Voter suppression is an issue across the United States, but the most egregious example is in Georgia, and Trevor Noah on Thursday's Daily Show made a suggestion that might just turn things around.

The governor's race in the state is extremely close, between Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp. Kemp happens to be the secretary of state, overseeing elections and voter registration, and Georgia has a law where voter registrations must match exactly to DMV and Social Security information. If not, the registration is put on hold. "It's funny how this happens with voting, but it never stops the IRS," Noah said. "The IRS is never like, 'Oh we have 'Trevok Noah,' I guess you don't have to pay taxes this year.' No, they'd be like, 'Hey, Trevor Noah, you misspelled your name dumbass, and you owe us $20,000.'"

Georgia's population is approximately 32 percent black, and a list of voter registrations on hold is nearly 70 percent black. "Well, well, well, my old friend racism, I've been expecting you," Noah said. You don't have to say who you're targeting to target someone, he added, "you just have to know which rules are likely to hit them the most." If he wanted to block white people from voting, he said, all he'd have to do is say "no pumpkin spice lattes in the voting booth."

In order to ensure that they can vote, Noah suggests that every black person in the United States register as a Republican. "Just say you're gonna vote red," he said, but do whatever you want once you've got a ballot. "I guarantee you, if the GOP thinks that black people are voting for them, they will make sure that your vote counts. They're going to be waving Trayvons into the voting booth like a third base coach." Watch the video — which uses Kanye West's love of the MAGA hat to prove Noah's point — below. Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

The Trump administration tried once again on Thursday to get the Supreme Court to toss a lawsuit on climate change, filed by 21 activists between the ages of 11 and 22.

The plaintiffs allege that federal officials are not doing enough to curb carbon pollution, thus violating their rights to due process under the Constitution. The activists are calling for major reductions in carbon dioxide emissions.

They first filed the lawsuit in 2015 against former President Barack Obama and government agencies, and Obama's administration also tried to get the suit thrown out. In July, the Supreme Court said it was too premature for the Trump administration to attempt to stop the lawsuit, and on Monday, federal Judge Ann Aiken in Eugene, Oregon, ruled that the case can go forward to trial on Oct. 29 unless the Supreme Court or 9th Circuit Court of Appeals intervene. Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

Rihanna was asked to headline Super Bowl LII's halftime show, but said no in support of Colin Kaepernick, a person with knowledge of the offer told Us Weekly on Thursday.

"The NFL and CBS really wanted Rihanna to be next year's performer in Atlanta," the person said. "They offered it to her, but she said no because of the kneeling controversy. She doesn't agree with the NFL's stance." Kaepernick, the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback, started a national conversation when he began kneeling during the national anthem to protest against police brutality. He has not played since the 2016 season, and has filed a grievance, accusing the NFL and owners of colluding to keep him from playing.

Once Rihanna turned down the NFL's offer, Maroon 5 was asked to perform, an invitation the band accepted. Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

While in Turkey on Wednesday, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo listened to an audio recording of the alleged murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi inside Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul, a senior Turkish official told ABC News on Thursday.

The official said the recording was played during a meeting, and Pompeo was also given a transcript. The Saudi-born Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist, was living in Virginia, and went to the consulate on Oct. 2 to get paperwork he needed for his upcoming wedding; this was the last time he was seen. Turkish officials have said, and U.S. intelligence increasingly believes, that Saudi Arabia is behind Khashoggi's disappearance and presumed murder. The State Department denied that Pompeo had a transcript of the recording or listened to it.

ABC News also is reporting that Turkish officials believe Khashoggi died of strangulation, after an eight-minute struggle. It's unclear if Pompeo passed the transcript on to Trump, but on Thursday, the president said it "certainly looks like" Khashoggi is dead, and if Saudi Arabia is behind it, the country will face "very severe" consequences. Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

The Interior Department's inspector general's office has found that Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke violated the department's travel policy by bringing his wife, Lola, on an overseas trip and letting her travel in government vehicles.

In a report released Thursday, the watchdog said Zinke violated additional policies by allowing his unarmed security detail to drive an associate to the airport. The report also said it cost taxpayers $25,000 for the Zinkes to travel with a security detail during a vacation to Turkey last summer. The inspector general's office is conducting at least four investigations into Zinke.

Also on Thursday, Interior Department officials said they never approved the hiring of Suzanne Israel Tuft, a political appointee to the Department of Housing and Urban Development, as the Interior Department's acting inspector general, despite HUD Secretary Ben Carson announcing her move last week. This was "100 percent false information," Interior Department spokeswoman Heather Swift said in a statement. "Ms. Tufts is not employed by the department and no decision was ever made to move her to Interior."

Swift confirmed to The Washington Post that Deputy Inspector General Mary Kendall is still leading the office, and said that while the White House did refer Tufts to the Interior Department "as a potential candidate" for a position in the inspector general's office, "at the end of the day, she was not offered a job at Interior." Catherine Garcia

October 18, 2018

It was another day in paradise for White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and National Security Adviser John Bolton, as they got into a screaming match outside of the Oval Office on Thursday.

Three people with knowledge of the matter told Bloomberg the argument revolved around immigration, border crossing, and how Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is running the agency. Nielsen was at the White House for meetings, the sources said, but she was not present for the profanity-filled argument. Several White House aides did hear the intense fight, Bloomberg reports, and were convinced one of the men would resign on the spot.

Bolton was critical of the Department of Homeland Security, while Kelly, who previously served as the department's secretary, defended Nielsen, his former deputy. Over the last several days, President Trump has been angrily tweeting about migrants headed for the border from Honduras, and he has threatened to shut down the U.S.-Mexico border if the caravan isn't stopped. One person told Bloomberg that Trump sided with Bolton, although the president later told reporters he didn't know there'd been an argument. Catherine Garcia

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