Mumbai imposes 'no selfie' zones after fatal accidents

India has highest rate of deaths linked to people taking self-portraits, with tourist spots a particular hazard

Selfie
(Image credit: IndranilL Mukherjee/AFP/Getty Images)

Police in Mumbai have banned people from taking pictures of themselves in parts of the city deemed to be dangerous after an alarming number of selfie-related deaths.

Sixteen "no selfie" zones face are now in action across the Indian city and anyone found taking a self-portrait in them will be slapped with a fine of 1,200 rupees (about £12.50), the Associated Press reports.

The areas identified as being potentially dangerous include parts of the coastline without barriers or railings and popular tourist attractions, such as the Marine Drive promenade.

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However, it does not look as if the ban is having an effect. "Despite clearly marked signs demarking the selfie-free zones, people can still be seen clicking away, and often going to the edges or standing on ledges to get the most thrilling shots," says AP.

India is home to the most number of people who have died taking selfies, according to a study by the data service provider Priceonomics.

"The stories are bountiful, and tragic and often involve large groups of teenagers," the company says.

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Earlier this month, an 18-year old student drowned after falling off a rock near a dam in the city of Nashik during a class picnic, while in January, another teenager drowned at the popular Bandstand Fort.

Despite the fact that men take significantly fewer pictures of themselves than women, they make up 73 per cent of all selfie-related deaths.

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