Fleeing man tries to fool police dogs, and more

A Washington state man fleeing police after a car crash doused himself in human excrement to evade police dogs.

Fleeing man tries to fool police dogs

A Washington state man fleeing police after a car crash doused himself in human excrement to evade police dogs. Gordon Flavia, 56, allegedly was drunk when he backed his Jeep into a condominium’s carport, demolishing it. When police showed up to investigate, Flavia fled into a portable toilet and doused himself with a bucket of human waste. “He thought the dogs were coming, and he was trying to throw off the scent,” said police.

Swede builds a home nuclear reactor

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A Swedish man has been arrested for trying to build a nuclear reactor in his kitchen. Richard Handl, 31, worked on the project for about six months, with nuclear materials he harvested from smoke alarms and old clocks. His goal, he said, was “to see if it’s possible to split atoms at home.” After triggering a minor explosion, he decided to notify authorities about his nuclear work, which brought the police to his door. In the future, Handl said after being released from jail, he will focus on “theoretical” aspects of nuclear physics.

Law school grad goes into labor during bar exam

A pregnant law school grad went into labor while taking the Illinois bar exam, but finished the test before heading to the hospital. Elana Nightingale Dawson, 29, had just begun the three-hour afternoon portion when she started experiencing strong contractions; she knew that if she left, she’d get an automatic fail. “I thought if I put my head in my hands and breathe deeply and do what I learned in [birthing] class, I would get through it,” Nightingale Dawson said. She finished the exam, pausing to breathe and gasp in pain, and, less than two hours later, gave birth to a son.

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