Where in the world is President Obama's debt plan?

As the nation careens toward an August 2 debt-ceiling deadline, the president fails to offer any concrete solutions

Edward Morrissey

Four times in the past three weeks, President Barack Obama has gone to the national media in order to warn about an oncoming fiscal catastrophe if Congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by August 2. The fourth appearance, on Tuesday, was at the daily White House press briefing, where Obama refused to take questions from reporters. Instead, Press Secretary Jay Carney had to provide the answer to the same questions that the White House correspondents have asked at all three previous press conferences — where is Obama's deficit plan?

The president has long positioned himself as the "adult in the room" on deficits, but his leadership has been singularly lacking. Over a year ago, Obama launched the National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform to find a set of policies that would reduce deficits and stabilize the federal government's financial standing. The panel of eight Republicans and ten Democrats, chaired by former Sen. Alan Simpson and former White House Chief of Staff Erskine Bowles, met throughout 2010 as spending and debt issues became the key to the midterm elections. In December, the panel presented its findings to the White House, and later to the nation on the commission website.

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