Can't stop, won't stop: Paul Krugman's never-ending call for more spending

Is there any point at which deficit spending becomes a problem?

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If a liberal is someone who often fails to take his own side in an argument, New York Times columnist Paul Krugman is the rare liberal who finds it impossible to take seriously anyone's argument but his own.

Ideologically speaking, Krugman's world is divided into three categories of people: diabolical conservatives who wouldn't hesitate to destroy the country or wreck the world economy in order to enrich a handful of billionaires; feckless centrists who idiotically place the long-term fiscal health of the country ahead of its far more urgent needs in the present; and sober Keynesian liberals like himself, who understand that what the U.S. and the world need above all else is deficit spending to stimulate growth, create jobs, raise wages, combat rising inequality, and avoid the deflationary trap that has ensnared the Japanese economy for the past two decades and threatens to sink the European Union at this very moment.

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