How young men are radicalized online against modernity

On the dangers of the postmodern backlash

The van used in the Toronto attack.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Cole Burston/Getty Images, Digital Vision ii/Alamy Stock Photo)

Toronto is still reeling from Monday's shocking attack. Alek Minassian, 25, allegedly drove a rented van onto the sidewalk in one of the city's most diverse neighborhoods, killing 10 and injuring 15. Police have suggested that most of the victims were women, and Minassian has been reportedly connected to a deeply misogynistic online community.

There are still many questions about the attack. But the trend of angry young men committing acts of violence after being radicalized online is hard to ignore, and is part of a growing, broader phenomenon that has seen them push back against feminism, racial and sexual diversity, and postmodern society in general. Making matters worse is that while some of the communities driving this reactionary movement are niche, it's increasingly finding a home in mainstream spaces too.

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