We don't need a Jan. 6 commission

We already know what happened at the Capitol that day

The Capitol.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Getty Images, iStock)

A couple of days after indicating he might be open to supporting a bipartisan inquiry into the Jan. 6 insurrection, Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) on Wednesday predictably yanked the football away from Democrats and announced his opposition to the project. This fits a pattern with McConnell, the Senate minority leader. In the days after rioters invaded the Capitol, he let it be known he might support the impeachment of former President Donald Trump — but then helped block Trump's conviction on a charge of inciting the disturbance. There's always a reason, any reason will do, why he can't get on board with holding Trump accountable.

But in the case of the Jan. 6 inquiry, one of McConnell's grounds for playing obstructionist — though probably not offered in good faith — at least seems plausible. "It's not at all clear what new facts or additional investigation yet another commission could lay on top of the existing efforts by law enforcement and Congress," he said.

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