The myth of bipartisanship

Let's stop pretending Republicans and Democrats can actually work together for the American people

President Biden.
(Image credit: Illustrated | AP Images, iStock)

In what might be the least shocking news of 2021, it's starting to look as though a bipartisan congressional deal on an infrastructure bill might not actually come to fruition.

Oh, negotiations on the issue are still officially underway — President Biden last week trimmed his proposal's price tag from $2.25 trillion down to $1.7 trillion, to be spent over a decade. But GOP officials turned up their noses at the offer, saying the costs need to be much lower. (The Republican bid started out at $568 billion over five years, though it has gone up somewhat since.) The media accordingly reported that an agreement between Democrats and Republicans was growing unlikely. "Compromise appears elusive," The Wall Street Journal reported. Hopes for bipartisan deals on Biden's proposals appear "dim," added The New York Times.

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