What the 'new right' would do with power

The Capitol.
(Image credit: Illustrated | iStock)

With Democrats in Congress facing strong headwinds in November's midterm elections and President Biden's approval ratings languishing in the low 40s, journalists have begun to ask what Republicans might try to accomplish if they regain full power in Washington in 2024.

In a recent column for The Washington Post, Greg Sargent posed the question in a provocative way, identifying three intellectual camps seeking to develop a policy agenda for candidates temperamentally aligned with Fox News host Tucker Carlson and GOP Senate candidates J.D. Vance (Ohio) and Blake Masters (Ariz.). Together these figures amount to a "new right," Sargent says, and its varying preoccupations are likely to shape the Republican Party over the years to come.

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Damon Linker

Damon Linker is a senior correspondent at TheWeek.com. He is also a former contributing editor at The New Republic and the author of The Theocons and The Religious Test.