Is a Biden-Harris ticket what Democrats want?

The sharpest opinions on the debate from around the web

A ticket.
(Image credit: Illustrated | Gettyimages)

Many Democrats saw President Biden's State of the Union address as his opening argument for a possible 2024 re-election campaign. Biden used the address to "appeal for political unity while touting his legislative achievements and taking credit for some recent improvements to the U.S. economy," writes CNBC. He outlined his policy goals for the next two years, including a new minimum tax on billionaires. He called for bipartisan efforts in Congress to "finish the job" by building on the last Congress' legislative accomplishments, which CNBC said "could lend itself to a re-election campaign."

His pitch appeared to help win over Democratic Party leaders. Rep. Jim Clyburn (D-S.C.), a key Biden backer, said he wants Biden to run again, and the White House says Biden intends to run. But polls still suggest that many of the party's voters hope Biden, who hasn't announced a final decision, will step aside and make room for new blood. Biden, 80, is already the oldest president in U.S. history, and some Democrats want him to pass the torch to a younger leader, according to recent polls. But Vice President Kamala Harris polls poorly — in a Rasmussen poll, only 39 percent wanted Harris on the ticket as Biden's running mate. Is a Biden-Harris ticket what Democrats want in 2024?

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