Do 'stand your ground' laws protect victims or promote violence?

Two recent gun violence tragedies have cast renewed scrutiny on the controversial self-defense protections in several states

A man holding a gun.
(Image credit: Stock Photo via Getty Images)

The debate over gun control seems to be never-ending, and a pair of recent tragedies have only further stirred the pot: A 16-year-old honor student in Kansas City — Ralph Yarl — was shot while ringing a doorbell at the wrong house, and a New York woman — Kaylin Gillis — died after a homeowner shot her allegedly for turning around in his driveway.

Both situations have cast renewed scrutiny on controversial self-defense protections known as "stand your ground" laws. Such rules are based on a common law ruling known as the "castle doctrine,'' which says that "individuals have the right to use reasonable force, including deadly force, to protect themselves against an intruder in their home," per the National Conference of State Legislatures. Today, there are about 35 states that have implemented some type of "stand your ground" law, CBS News reports.

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