Should labs try to create exotic animal meat?

Lab-grown meat is an emerging trend, but where should it draw the line?

Lab grown meat
(Image credit: ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)

Meat alternatives seem to be all the rage these days, with plant-based meats rising to the forefront. However, another option is also gaining traction: laboratory-produced meat. Until now, these products have mostly been replacements for conventional meats. Described by Bon Appétit as "beef grown from cow cells and pork grown from pig cells," unlike plant-based meats, lab-grown meats are actually made from the genetic building blocks of animals.

However, with the uptick of this trend, another offshoot of the meat industry has risen: exotic lab-based meats. An Australian company, Vow, recently unveiled a meatball made from a meat-producing gene of woolly mammoth DNA — yes, the same animal that has been extinct for 4,000 years. While this meatball was not edible, and was created only to market the possibilities of sustainable meat, the company is jumping ahead with the exotic trend, and has "already investigated the potential of more than 50 species, including alpaca, buffalo, crocodile, kangaroo, peacocks and different types of fish," The Guardian reports. The fish-cultivated meat is slated to be sold in Singapore later this year.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us