How the Post Office got its prosecution powers

Scandal shines light on institution's historic ability to prosecute its own cases

A person wearing a T-shirt with a Post Office logo on the back outside the Royal Courts of Justice
More than 700 Post Office branch managers have been convicted of false accounting, theft and fraud after private prosecutions
(Image credit: Tolga Akmen / AFP via Getty Images)

After years of campaigning, hundreds of Post Office workers accused of crimes including fraud and false accounting could see their names cleared by the end of the year. 

New legislation will ensure that subpostmasters who were wrongfully convicted as a result of faulty accounting software between 1999 and 2015 are "swiftly exonerated and compensated", Rishi Sunak said yesterday. During that 16-year period, more than 700 people were prosecuted in one of the UK's biggest miscarriages of justice.

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