'This migrant crisis is not unlike problems we've faced before'

Opinion, comment and editorials of the day

People are seen around the "tent city" for migrants at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center on August 16, 2023 in the Queens borough of New York City. The "tent city" meant for migrants opened on Tuesday and is expected to host about 1,000 migrants as state officials struggle to handle the influx of asylum seekers.
People are seen around the "tent city" for migrants at Creedmoor Psychiatric Center on August 16, 2023 in the Queens borough of New York City. The "tent city" meant for migrants opened on Tuesday and is expected to host about 1,000 migrants as state officials struggle to handle the influx of asylum seekers
(Image credit: Leonardo Munoz / VIEW press via Getty Images)

'We need to reestablish and enforce credible limits on immigration'

Jeremy Beck in the New York Post

People "of all political stripes" want to curb an "unprecedented flood" of migrants overwhelming cities like New York, says Jeremy Beck in the New York Post. Something similar happened in the decades after the Civil War, when millions "flocked to America" from Southern and Eastern Europe. "The situation benefited slumlords and sweatshop owners but few others." Then as now, the solution is for Congress to "humanely, but credibly, scale immigration back to a more sustainable level."

Read more

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up

'The only Republican who can still beat Trump'

Jennifer Rubin in The Washington Post

"Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has taken on the unmistakable aura of a loser," says Jennifer Rubin in The Washington Post. Other presidential candidates hoping to "save the Republican Party from itself" aren't any better. Except Nikki Haley. The former South Carolina governor is winning over influential donors, including the Koch network. "That hardly makes her a likely winner," but she's the only Republican who doesn't threaten democracy and "has a chance to disable Trump."

Read more

Robbie Gramer in Foreign Policy

"The axis of evil is back," says Robbie Gramer in Foreign Policy. Two decades after former President George W. Bush warned about "a growing alliance between China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea," Moscow is "leaning on Iranian and North Korean arms" and Chinese economic support for its Ukraine war. Suddenly, politicians are fretting again about these "deeply connected" foes. But "lumping" such "disparate powers together" could "lead to a new generation of U.S. foreign-policy debacles."

Read more

'A dark road, where killing is just a matter of finding the right rationale, the right time'

Gregg Gonsalves in The Nation

The Israel-Hamas conflict is "horrific," says Gregg Gonsalves in The Nation. But arguing what's worse, "indiscriminate killing of thousands of Palestinians" or Hamas attacks and hostage-taking in Israel, suggests that violence can be "justified" or "condoned" if it's for the right political cause. It's all "barbaric." We should stand "against violence and for peace" as a matter of public health. "Violence is a choice, not an imperative," and "choosing peace is something" everyone can do.

Read more

To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us