Instagram scales back short-form videos, recommended posts after negative feedback

Instagram is rolling back some of its recent changes after receiving negative feedback.

The Meta-owned company used a "test-version of the app that opened to full-screen photos and videos," Platformer reports, but users weren't too happy that it was starting to look more like TikTok's app interface, heavily featuring recommended content alongside that of accounts they follow.

Instagram chief Adam Mosseri said despite the walkback, he's "glad we took a risk — if we're not failing every once in a while, we're not thinking big enough or bold enough." Within the next few weeks, users will begin to see fewer recommended posts in their feed.

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The Washington Post reported that Mosseri's decision to scale back was partially the result of a revolt from some of "Instagram's most prominent users." Celebrities such as Kylie Jenner and Kim Kardashian shared a viral quote graphic that reads: "Make Instagram Instagram again. (Stop trying to be TikTok I just want to see cute photos of my friends.) Sincerely, everyone." It was originally created by influencer Tatiana Bruening early Wednesday.

The changes were also reflected on Facebook, where users complained they opened the platform to interact with family and friends, but were now feeling forced to watch complete strangers' videos.

NPR reports that Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg "described it as a 'major shift' from a feed of posts determined by who you follow to one curated by new AI technology that he calls a 'discovery engine.'"

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