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July 15, 2014

Former Vice President Dick Cheney appeared Tuesday on CNN, where he slammed President Obama and alleged that the president does not even believe in having a strong national security policy for the United States. Cheney does not, however, favor impeaching Obama, as other conservatives like Sarah Palin are now agitating to do:

I'm not prepared at this point to call for the impeachment of the president. I think he is the worst president of my lifetime; I fundamentally disagree with him, and I think he's doing a lot of things wrong.... But I think that gets to be a bit of a distraction — just like the impeachment of Bill Clinton did. Everybody could get geared up to have a big fight over it, but it wasn't going anyplace. [Cheney via CNN]

The discussion about impeachment begins at just after the 3:50 mark in the video below. --Eric Kleefeld

10:51 a.m.

There's been a lot of talk of the United Kingdom's Prime Minister Boris Johnson's government orchestrating the country's departure from the European Union on Oct. 31 without a deal if the two sides can't come to terms on a new agreement by then. But what would a no-deal Brexit actually look like?

A leaked dossier compiled by the United Kingdom's Cabinet Office might have the answer and it's not a particularly pretty picture.

The government documents predicted that the country will hit a three-month meltdown at its ports, a hard Irish border, and shortages of fuel, food and medicine if it leaves the European Union without a deal on Oct. 31. Without a withdrawal agreement, the document says, the U.K. will "be vulnerable to severe extended delays" for medical supplies and food, with rising prices also a possibility. A hard Irish border would also be difficult to avoid, per the documents.

There appears to be a debate over whether the documents represent the worst-case scenario for a no-deal Brexit or if they are the British government's actual assessment of the possible situation.

A senior source said the document is "not Project Fear," but "the most realistic assessment of what the public face with no deal." But that notion has been disputed. Chancellor Michael Gove said it is, in fact, a worst-case scenario report, while the government of British territory Gibraltar took it a step further, arguing that the papers were "out of date" and the issues in it have "already been dealt with." Tim O'Donnell

10:26 a.m.

Former Vice President Joe Biden is not changing his message.

The Democratic presidential candidate reiterated on Saturday during a fundraiser in Massachusetts that, if elected to the Oval Office, he plans on cooperating with Republicans. "There's an awful lot of good Republicans out there," Biden said. "I get in trouble for saying that with Democrats, but the truth of the matter is, every time we got in trouble with our administration, remember who got sent up to Capitol Hill to fix it? Me. Because they know I respect the other team."

Biden said many GOP members are decent people, who are intimidated by the Trump administration. Biden has received criticism for expressing similar views of compromise in the past, especially from the more progressive wing of the Democratic Party. His most recent comments have already led to some similar reactions. But not everyone is fundamentally opposed to this line of thinking, even Biden's primary opponents.

Read more at The Hill. Tim O'Donnell

7:50 a.m.

A local affiliate of the Islamic State claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing on Saturday night at a crowded wedding party in Kabul, Afghanistan. The blast killed at least 63 people, including women and children, and another 182 were injured.

The Taliban, which is negotiating an end to an 18-year conflict with the United States, condemned the violence and denied any involvement. "The attack on the wedding hall is a brutal act," Sohail Shaheen, a spokesman for the Taliban said. "The Islamic Emirate condemns it in the strongest terms. We share the sorrow of the people."

Afghanistan's President Ashraf Ghani, on the other hand, was not ready to rid them of responsibility. In a tweet expressing condolences to the victims, Ghani wrote that the "Taliban cannot absolve themselves of blame, for the provide platform for terrorists."

The attack occurred in a neighborhood in the western part of the city that is home to many of the country's Shiite Hazara community. ISIS, whose members follow Sunni doctrine, have frequently claimed responsibility for attacks targeting Shiites. The militant group's statement said a Pakistani ISIS fighter seeking martyrdom targeted the gathering.

The incident has stoked fear. Mohammed Naeem, a part owner of the venue where the attack occurred, said "very few people may dare to go to wedding halls from now on." Read more at The Associated Press and The Washington Post. Tim O'Donnell

August 17, 2019

Delays, delays, delays.

The U.S. Commerce Department is expected to grant Huawei a 90-day extension that permits the Chinese technology firm to buy supplies from U.S. companies, two sources familiar with the situation told Reuters. The reason behind the extension is so that Huawei can service existing customers. The agreement, which was set to lapse on Aug. 19, will allow Huawei to maintain existing telecommunications networks and provide software updates to Huawei handsets.

The U.S. blacklisted Huawei earlier this year, alleging the company could potentially harm U.S. national security and foreign policy interests. Reuters reports that the decision to grant Huawei the temporary reprieve could change by Monday. President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping are expected to discuss the firm in a call this weekend.

It's the second significant delay this week amid the ongoing trade war between Beijing and Washington. On Tuesday, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced certain products would not be subject to a 10 percent tariff on Chinese imports to the U.S. until after the holiday season. Huawei throws another wrinkle into the U.S.'s plan, as analysts question what the concessions might mean for potential future negotiations.

Read more at Reuters. Tim O'Donnell

August 17, 2019

As promised, El Paso, Texas, came out in support of Antonio Basco, whose wife, Margie Reckard, was killed in a mass shooting in the city earlier in August that resulted in 22 deaths.

Basco asked the funeral home that was managing Reckard's service to put out a public invitation to attend, as he had no other family in the area. Within 24 hours people from Texas, across the country, and around the world responded with flowers, cards, and heartfelt notes on social media. Over 1,000 people have also donated to a GoFundMe campaign, raising more than $25,000 to help Basco with expenses.

Ultimately, the service Basco thought no one would attend was filled with 400 mourners, while hundreds of others stood outside in 100-degree heat to pay their respects.

"People were telling me they came from different faiths, different cities," Reckard's grandson, Tyler, said. "It's just incredible how much love and support every single one of you has shown." Tim O'Donnell

August 17, 2019

As early as 2017, the Trump administration tried for months to grant states the power to deny undocumented immigrant children from enrolling in public schools, Bloomberg reports.

President Trump's senior adviser, Stephen Miller, who is known for his hardline stance on immigration, spearheaded the effort, people familiar with the situation said. Ultimately, however, the contingent supporting the measure abandoned the idea upon realization that the plan would likely violate Plyler v. Doe, a 1982 Supreme Court case that prohibited states from denying free public education based on immigration status. The court ruled that punishing children for their parents' actions "does not comport with fundamental conceptions of justice."

Miller's efforts reportedly included consideration of a guidance memo issued by the Education Department that would tell states they had the option to refuse students with an undocumented status to attend school, but it was never issued. Liz Hill, a spokeswoman for the Education Department, said it was never issued because it would never have even been considered.

While nothing came of the efforts, it fits in with the White House's larger efforts to discourage illegal crossings at the southern border. Read more at Bloomberg. Tim O'Donnell

August 17, 2019

The Kennedy political dynasty could return to the Senate, The New York Times reports.

An anonymous senior Democratic official told the Times that Rep. Joseph Kennedy III (D-Mass.), the grandson of Robert F. Kennedy, is contemplating launching a primary challenge against Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) next year. The official said the congressman would make a decision in the coming weeks, although Politico reports that Kennedy's House re-election campaign maintains that he's staying in that chamber of Congress.

But the 38-year-old Kennedy has garnered enthusiasm from would-be supporters and his aides did not deny that they commissioned testing his prospects against Markey, which the Times reports even Markey's advisers acknowledged would likely show Kennedy leading.

The possibility of a high-profile primary face-off between Markey and Kennedy would be another example of the youth movement within the Democratic Party challenging the "old guard." Markey is 73, but he is also a "committed" progressive in the same mold as Kennedy. Their divide, then, would be more along generational lines than ideology.

Kennedy is popular, but even if he does decide to run for Senate, his last name isn't likely to scare off Markey. "Ed is not going anywhere," Paul Tencher, a senior adviser to Markey's campaign, told the Times. "He's going to run, and he's going to run no matter who is in this race." Markey has already secured the support of his colleague Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.). Warren's seat, of course, could be another opportunity for Kennedy — and others — to seek election to the Senate if she wins the presidency in 2020. Read more at The New York Times and Politico. Tim O'Donnell

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