Persian Gulf could experience 'intolerable' heat by end of the century

Iraqis try to cool off during the summer.
(Image credit: Sabah Arar/AFP/Getty Images)

By 2100, parts of the Persian Gulf could experience heat and humidity so extreme that a person would not be able to survive being outside for several hours, researchers said.

In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Climate Change, Jeremy S. Pal of Loyola Marymount University and Elfatih A. B. Eltahir of MIT used climate models and a method of measuring atmospheric conditions known as wet-bulb temperature to determine how hot it would have to get for a person to sweat and still not cool off; they found that a wet-bulb temperature of 95 degrees Fahrenheit hits the mark (that's roughly the equivalent of a heat-index reading of 165 degrees Fahrenheit). After six hours of exposure, the conditions "would probably be intolerable even for the fittest of humans, resulting in hyperthermia," the researchers said.

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