John Oliver vividly paints a dystopian, clickbaity future of journalism, because of you

Can John Oliver make you subscribe to your local newspaper?
(Image credit: Last Week Tonight)

"The newspaper industry today is in big trouble," John Oliver said on Sunday's Last Week Tonight. "Papers have been closing and downsizing for years, and that affects all of us. Even if you only get your news from Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Arianna Huffington's Blockquote Junction and Book Excerpt Clearinghouse, those places are often just repackaging the work of newspapers." So are TV news shows, he said, and "even stupid shows like ours lean heavily on local papers. In fact, whenever this show is mistakenly called 'journalism,' it is a slap in the face to the actual journalists whose work we rely on."

"The media is a food chain that would fall apart without local newspapers," Oliver said, noting the pricing structure of online versus print ads and detailing the decline of great papers like The Oregonian, and the increased workload on the remaining reporters. "If journalists are constantly required to write, edit, shoot videos, and tweet, mistakes are going to get made," he said. "But here is where it gets frightening," Oliver said: When papers cut full-time statehouse reporters to focus on online content, and their leaders give in to "the temptation to gravitate toward whatever gets the most clicks," corruption can thrive.

Subscribe to The Week

Escape your echo chamber. Get the facts behind the news, plus analysis from multiple perspectives.

SUBSCRIBE & SAVE
https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/flexiimages/jacafc5zvs1692883516.jpg

Sign up for The Week's Free Newsletters

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

From our morning news briefing to a weekly Good News Newsletter, get the best of The Week delivered directly to your inbox.

Sign up
To continue reading this article...
Continue reading this article and get limited website access each month.
Get unlimited website access, exclusive newsletters plus much more.
Cancel or pause at any time.
Already a subscriber to The Week?
Not sure which email you used for your subscription? Contact us