Speed Reads

Trump's Wall

Texas has the longest U.S. border with Mexico. Zero of its 38 members of Congress support Trump's wall.

Texas sends 38 lawmakers to Congress — 36 House members and two senators — and 25 of them are Republican. None of them are willing to endorse President Trump's plan for a gulf-to-sea border wall. Not all of Texas' congressional delegation necessarily opposes the wall, but when The Texas Tribune asked about Trump's signature policy issue a few weeks ago, none would go on record as thinking it is a good idea.

Many of them were in favor of erecting barriers in some sections of the border, adding Border Patrol officers, and using surveillance technology, but Sens. John Cornyn (R) and Ted Cruz (R) only backed completing the last 50 miles of 700 miles of border fencing approved by Congress in 2006, most of it in Arizona. Others fretted about using eminent domain to seize land from ranchers, often family land passed down for generations.

Rep. Will Hurd (R), whose competitive House district spans 800 miles of border, from San Antonio to right outside El Paso, released a stronger statement on Wednesday. "Building a wall is the most expensive and least effective way to secure the border," he said. "Big Bend National Park and many areas in my district are perfect examples of where a wall is unnecessary and would negatively impact the environment, private property rights, and economy," Hurd said, adding that it would be "impossible" to build a wall in some sections of his district.